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From the Outside In: Angela Merkel as Opposition Leader, 2000-2005

Clay Clemens

Keywords: CHRISTIAN DEMOCRATIC UNION; CHRISTIAN SOCIAL UNION; UNION PARTIES; ANGELA MERKEL; POLITICAL PARTIES; REFORM; EDMUND STOIBER

Abstract

As chair of the CDU in 2000, and of its joint Bundestag caucus with the CSU in 2002, Angela Merkel was the fist woman and fist easterner to head a major German party; she had risen as a protege of Helmut Kohl, but breaking with him over his financial improprieties vaulted her into power. These features of her biography made her leadership unconventional. So too did her style, characterized by interpersonal reserve and lack of charisma. Merkel's views on cultural issues and economic policy-in particular, reform of the welfare state-were more liberal than those of her Union's mainstream. Finally, her resources within the CDU/CSU were limited to a loose network of younger outsiders, who helped sustain her against rivals at the Land level. While Merkel survived a poor CDU/CSU election in 2005 to become chancellor, her time as opposition leader suggested that she would struggle in that role too, yet also served as a caution against underrating her.

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