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Membering and Dismembering: The Poetry and Relationality of Animal Bodies in Kilimanjaro

Knut Christian Myhre

Keywords: AFRICA; ANTHROPOLOGY; BUTCHERING; ETHNOGRAPHY; EXCHANGE; LANGUAGE; MELANESIA; SACRIFICE

Abstract

This article extends Malcolm Ruel's notion of 'non-sacrificial ritual killing' to explore the mode of butchering and the sharing of meat among the Chagga-speaking people of Tanzania. It is argued that these processes are forms of elicitation and decomposition that can be illuminated by analytics developed from Melanesian ethnography. However, it is shown that these processes emerge as such only when the language use surrounding and pertaining to butchering is taken into consideration. On this basis, it is argued that butchering constitutes a poetic enunciation that both distorts and expands the mode of revelation and the relational form described from Melanesia. Finally, it is claimed that this entails an alternative relationship between language and life that recasts the relation between vernacular and analytical language, as well as between theory and ethnography.

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