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The practices, policies, and politics of transforming inequality in South Asia: Ethnographies of affirmative action

Alpa Shah and Sara Shneiderman

Keywords: AFFIRMATIVE ACTION; CASTE; ETHNICITY AND CLASS; ETHNOGRAPHY OF THE STATE; DIFFERENTIATED CITIZENSHIP; INDIA; INEQUALITY; NEPAL

Abstract

This is the introduction to a special section of Focaal that includes seven articles on the anthropology of affirmative action in South Asia. The section promotes the sustained, critical ethnographic analysis of affirmative action measures adopted to combat historical inequalities around the world. Turning our attention to the social field of affirmative action opens up new fronts in the anthropological effort to understand the state by carefully engaging the relationship between the formation and effects of policies for differentiated citizenship. We explore this relationship in the historical and contemporary context of South Asia, notably India and Nepal. We argue that affirmative action policies always transform society, but not always as expected. The relationship between political and socioeconomic inequality can be contradictory. Socioeconomic inequalities may persist or be refigured in new terms, as policies of affirmative action and their experiential effects are intimately linked to broader processes of economic liberalization and political transformation.

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