Instrumental Europe

Practices of Daily Engagement with the European Union

in Anthropological Journal of European Cultures
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  • 1 University of Alabama mgalbrai@ua.edu
  • 2 State University of New York at Binghamton twilson@binghamton.edu

Religious organisations that secularise their community outreach to gain European Union (EU) funding, border-city residents whose consumption practices exploit cross-border economic disparities, EU member states that protect their domestic labour market by restricting access to legal work and medical care for citizens of new member states, recently admitted citizens who nevertheless take advantage of increased opportunities for mobility to improve their economic and social standing, and even in some cases use their scepticism about membership to promote their personal or national interests within the EU – all of these examples point to the complex and varied ways in which instrumentality figures in day-to-day dealings with the European Union. This special issue of AJEC seeks to contribute to the anthropological study of the European Union by examining ways in which various individuals, groups and institutions use the EU to pursue their political, economic and social goals at local, national and transnational levels within Europe.

Anthropological Journal of European Cultures

(formerly: Anthropological Yearbook of European Cultures)

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