Test Run -- Stop and Go

Mapping Nodes of Mobility and Migration

in Anthropological Journal of European Cultures

When increasing numbers of people are obliged to spend increasing amounts of time in transit then nodes and hubs alongside major traffic corridors – where traffic comes to halt and exchange between actors en route happens – represent new forms of urbanity and public space, sites where both individuals' routes, routines, and rituals and political transitions and urban transformations can be explored. If we follow Henri Lefebvre's thesis that urbanity is no longer defined by density but by the degree of difference performed at specific places, then these nodes paradigmatically represent new forms of urbanity and public space. What remained largely unexplored in the investigations so far was emphasising these nodes as polyrhythmic ensembles, linked to their temporal adaptability – reacting on daily, weekly and seasonal rhythms of traffic flows – and their interdependence on one another.