Anthropological Journal of European Cultures

(formerly: Anthropological Yearbook of European Cultures)

Editors
Patrick Laviolette, University College London, England
Aleksandar Bošković, University of Belgrade, Serbia


Subjects: Anthropology, Cultural Studies, European Studies


Call for Papers: Open Call


 Available on JSTOR    

   

Latest Issue Table of Contents

Volume 30 (2021): Issue 1 (Mar 2021)

Anthropological Journal of European Cultures
Volume 30, Issue 2 – 2021

ARTICLES

Britain, Brexit and Euroscepticism: Anthropological Perspectives on Angry Politics, Technopopulism and the UK Referendum
Cris Shore

Consuming and Certifying Quality: Alta Qualità and Food Choice in Italy
Lauren Crossland-Marr

Being There While not Being There: Reflections on Multi-sited Ethnography and Field Access in the Context of Forced Migration
Laura K. McAdams-Otto and Sarah Nimführ

‘Building Rapport: 'Curing' and 'Charming' as Cultural Intimacy in Everyday Bureaucratic Encounters in the Northern Ireland Farming Community’
Irene Ketonen-Keating

FORUM: Decolonising Europe: National and Transnational Projects

Introduction: Decolonisation Matters
Patrícia Ferraz de Matos and Livio Sansone

Looking for a Space to Breathe: Decolonising Italian Cities
Elisabetta Campagni

Stuck in the Colonial Past? Perpetuating Racist, Environmental Myths of Kenya in a Swiss Zoo
Samantha Sithole, Marianna Fernandes, Olivier Hymas, Kavita Sharma, and Gretchen Walters

The Transnational Propaganda of White Nationalism: An Obstacle to Decolonisation
Jordan Kiper

Sardinian Lives Matter: Dynamics and Reactions in an Italian Internal Colony
Luca Lai and Sharon Watson

Decolonising Arts and Culture in Belgium: Some Clues from the Black Out Media
Axel Mudahemuka Gossiaux 

REVIEWS

Introduction: Recent Studies in the Anthropology of Eastern Christianities 
Alessandro Testa

Milena Benovska (2021), Orthodox Revivalism in Russia: Driving Forces and Moral Quests (London: Routledge).
Review by Tobias Köllner

Tobias Köllner (2020), Religion and Politics in Contemporary Russia. Beyond the Binary of Power and Authority (London: Routledge).
Review by Agata Ładykowska

Giuseppe Tateo (2020), Under the Sign of the Cross: The People’s Salvation Cathedral and the Church Building Industry in Postsocialist Romania, (Oxford: Berghahn).
Review by Simion Pop

Tornike Metreveli (2020), Orthodox Christianity and the Politics of Transition. Ukraine, Serbia and Georgia (London: Routledge).
Review by Giuseppe Tateo

Valdimar Tr. Hafstein and Martin Skrydstrup (2020), Patrimonialities: Heritage vs. Property (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
Review by Jason Baird Jackson

Modeen, Mary and Iain Biggs (2021), Creative Engagements with Ecologies of Place. Geopoetics, Deep Mapping and Slow Residencies (London: Routledge).
Review by Ullrich Kockel

Samantha Walton (2020), The Living World: Nan Shepherd and Environmental Thought (London: Bloomsbury Academic).
Review by Máiréad Nic Craith

Jone Salomonsen, Michael Houseman, Sarah M. Pike and Graham Hervey (eds) (2021), Reassembling Democracy: Ritual as a Cultural Resource (London: Bloomsbury Academic).
Review by Viola Teisenhoffer

Volume 30 / 2021, 2 Issues per volume (spring, autumn)

Aims & Scope

Published since 1990, Anthropological Journal of European Cultures (AJEC) engages with current debates and innovative research agendas addressing the social and cultural transformations of contemporary European societies. The journal serves as an important forum for ethnographic research in and on Europe, which in this context is not defined narrowly as a geopolitical entity but rather as a meaningful cultural construction in people's lives, which both legitimates political power and calls forth practices of resistance and subversion. By presenting both new field studies and theoretical reflections on the history and politics of studying culture in Europe anthropologically, AJEC encompasses different academic traditions of engaging with its subject, from social and cultural anthropology to European ethnology and empirische Kulturwissenschaften.

In addition to the thematic focus of each issue, which has characterised the journal from its inception, AJEC now also carries individual articles on other topics addressing aspects of social and cultural transformations in contemporary Europe from an ethnographically grounded anthropological perspective. All such contributions are peer reviewed. Each issue also includes book reviews and reports on major current research programmes.


Indexing/Abstracting

Anthropological Journal of European Cultures is indexed/abstracted in:

  • American Bibliography of Slavic and East European Studies (University of Illinois)
  • Anthropological Index (RAI)
  • Anthropological Literature (Tozzer Library – Harvard University)
  • A Current Bibliography on African Affairs (Baywood)
  • Bibliometric Research Indicator List (BFI)
  • Emerging Sources Citation Index (Web of Science)
  • IBR – International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences (De Gruyter)
  • IBZ – International Bibliography of Periodical Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences (De Gruyter)
  • IBSS – International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (ProQuest)
  • Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (Proquest)
  • MLA Directory of Periodicals
  • MLA International Bibliography
  • Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, Series and Publishers
  • Scopus (Elsevier)
  • Social Services Abstracts (Proquest)
  • Sociological Abstracts (Proquest)
  • Worldwide Political Science Abstracts (Proquest)

Editors
Patrick Laviolette, University College London, UK
Aleksandar Bošković, University of Belgrade, Serbia

Reviews Editor: Katarina Mitrović, University of Belgrade, Serbia

Forum Editors
Patrícia Ferraz de Matos, University of Lisbon, Portugal
Philip McDermott, Ulster University, Northern Ireland

Social Media Editors
Ana Ivasiuc, Philipps University Marburg, Germany
Ryan Alison Foley, University of Oxford, UK

Editorial Board
Andrés Barrera González, Complutense University, Madrid, Spain
Vytis Čiubrinskas,Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas, Lithuania
Cristina Clopot, Royal Society of Edinburgh, Scotland
Dorle Dracklé, University of Bremen, Germany
Alexei Elfimov, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
Annet Fleischer, Max Planck Institute Göttingen, Germany
Tracey Heatherington, The University of British Columbia, Canada
Laura Hirvi, Virtual Reality Association, Berlin, Germany
Anna Horolets, University of Warsaw, Poland
Ullrich Kockel, Intercultural Research Centre, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Judith Laister, University of Graz, Austria
Sharon Macdonald, Centre for Anthropological Research on Museums and Heritage, Germany
George Marcus, University of California, Irvine, USA
Jon Mitchell, University of Sussex, UK
Máiréad Nic Craith, Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Tatiana Zachar Podolinská, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia
Bruno Riccio, University of Bologna, Italy
Regina Römhild, Humboldt-Universität, Berlin, Germany
Alexandra Schwell, Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt, Austria
Cris Shore, Goldsmiths University of London, UK
Robin Smith, Utrech University, The Netherlands
Alessandro Testa, Charles University, Czech Republic
Elisabeth Timm, University of Münster, Germany
Thomas M. Wilson, Binghamton University (SUNY), USA
Helena Wulff, University of Stockholm, Sweden

 

Manuscript Submission

Please carefully review the submission and style guide PDF here before submitting.

The editors welcome contributions. Authors should submit articles as Microsoft Word or Rich Text Format (rtf) files to the online submissions system: https://ojs3.berghahnjournals.com/index.php/ajec

Authors must register with the journal on the submission website prior to submitting, or, if already registered, they can simply log in. On registering as an Author, authors have the option of also registering as a Reviewer (to be called upon to undertake peer reviews of other submission).

Each issue has a thematic focus, which is supervised either by a guest editor or a member of the editorial board. Details of themes and editors are normally announced at least two issues in advance. All correspondence should be addressed to the editorial office unless otherwise indicated.

Guest Editor Guidelines can be found here.


Review copies of books should not be sent without first contacting the reviews editor, Katarina Mitrović, at kmmitrovic@gmail.com.

Have other questions? Please refer to the various Berghahn Info for Authors pages for general information and guidelines including topics such as article usage and permissions for Berghahn journal article authors.


License Agreement

As part of the Berghahn Open Anthro initiative, articles in Anthropological Journal of European Cultures (AJEC) are published open access under a Creative Commons license.

Authors must visit our License Options page to select and download their preferred license agreement. Completed and signed forms should be sent to copyright@berghahnjournals.com.


Ethics Statement

Authors published in Anthropological Journal of European Cultures (AJEC) certify that their works are original and their own. The editors certify that all materials, with the possible exception of editorial introductions, book reviews and some types of commentary, have been subjected to double-blind peer review by qualified scholars in the field. While the publishers and the editorial board make every effort to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions or statements appear in this journal, they wish to make clear that the data and opinions appearing in the articles herein are the sole responsibility of the contributor concerned. For a more detailed explanation concerning these qualifications and responsibilities, please see the complete AJEC ethics statement.

 

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'0 Feet Away'

The Queer Cartography of French Gay Men's Geo-social Media Use

Why do gay men utilise geo-social media applications such as Grindr and Scruff? Social media scholarship describes technological mediations and changes to social space and communities; however, there are theoretical gaps concerning what geo-social technology means for gay men. I suggest that gay men's ability to see other gay men, via geo-social media, reveals the queer cartography of any geographical location. This re-mapping of social space proves the public sphere less heteronormative than purported, cultivates community between gay men who may initiate face-to-face contact utilising geo-locative technology, and allows gay men to interact with one another outside of specifically gay spaces. This research is based in Toulouse, France, and adds to scholarship concerning French gay men's resistance to heteronormativity. This research also holds global significance concerning subjugated communities' uses of geo-social technology in their resistance against dominant cultures.

Expressive Resources

Knowledge, Agency and European Ethnology

Author: Regina Bendix

Drawing examples from ethnic and popular music as well as from folk art, the paper explores the multivalence of expressive forms as local and European, even global aesthetic resources, whose territorial or ethno-national connection is - due to the power of aesthetic affect - but one among many possibilities of identification. It is argued first that the resource dimension of cultural expression has been furthered by the documentation and classification techniques of ethnological and folkloristic knowledge production, which in turn also facilitated circulation in multiple context. Second, the paper encourages that scholarship expand from recognising a political identification and instrumentalisation of aesthetic resources to understanding the economic appropriation of the production and consumption of such resources.

On Memory Work in Post-communist Europe

A Case Study on Romania's Ways of Remembering its Pronatalist Past

Author: Lorena Anton

Taking the memory of pronatalism in contemporary Romania as a case study, this article is an attempt to view the national politics of memory of contemporary Europe with regard to its communist past from an anthropological perspective. From 1966 to 1989, the communist regime imposed extreme policies of controlled demography in Romania, as it was imputed, for 'the good of the socialist nation'. Profamily measures were developed in parallel to the banning of abortion on request and the making of contraception almost inaccessible. The social remembering of such a difficult past is still a taboo in contemporary Romanian society. This general lack of public remembering, which is still playing a role in the current situation of Romania's reproductive health, is influenced by the interrelations between the different forms of pronatalist memory. The analysis is based on oral history fieldwork conducted between 2003 and 2008, and is theoretically informed by the interdisciplinary field of Memory Studies.

Belonging through Languagecultural Practices in the Periphery

The Politics of Carnival in the Dutch Province of Limburg

In this article, we will present two case studies of language and cultural practices that are part of or strongly related to carnival, in the Dutch peripheral province of Limburg, and more precisely in the southern Limburgian city of Heerlen, which in turn is considered peripheral vis-à-vis the provincial capital Maastricht. We will consider carnival as a political force field in which opposing language and cultural practices are involved in the production of belonging as an official, public-oriented 'formal structure' of membership, and belonging as a personal, intimate feeling of being 'at home' in a place (place-belongingness) (Antonsich 2010; Yuval-Davis 2006). In the case studies presented here, we take seriously the idea that ideology, linguistic form and the situated use of language are dialectically related (Silverstein 1985). In doing so, we wish to transcend disciplinary boundaries between anthropology and (socio)linguistics in Europe.

Interpretative Repertoire of Victimhood

Narrating Experiences of Discrimination and Ethnic Hatred among Polish Migrants in Belfast

Author: Marta Kempny

Based on one year of ethnographic fieldwork, this article discusses the narratives of perceived discrimination and ethnic hatred of Polish migrants in Belfast. Using narrative theory, it examines the construction of identity of Poles as an unprivileged stratum of the Northern Irish society. Migrants' stories are followed by analysis of the contradictions and tensions between what they construct as their realities and 'objective truth'. Subsequently, the article accounts for these tensions by exploring the links between 'cultural repertoires' of Polish migrants and the ways in which their narratives are presented.