Appalling Tehran

Translation of the French Serial Story and Its Effect on the Persian Serial Story

in Anthropology of the Middle East
View More View Less
  • 1 Shiraz University of Medical Sciences manijeh.abdolahi@gmail.com
  • 2 Shiraz University of Medical Sciences asalehe@yahoo.com
Restricted access

Abstract

This article examines French-Iranian literary interactions in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century, which arguably had ongoing effects in Iran on attitudes towards links between morality and social and economic inequality. Some of the earliest fictional stories published in Persian-language newspapers, in the 1850s, were French. This trend continued, through Iran’s Constitutional Revolution (1906), into the early decades of the twentieth century. During this period, Morteza Moshfeq-e Kazemi began writing the first Persian serial story and novel, Tehran-e Makhuf (Appalling Tehran). The present study investigates the effects of the translation of French serial stories on Persian ones, with a specific focus on the impact of the novel Les Mystères de Paris (1842–1843), by Eugène Sue, on the Persian novel Tehran-e Makhuf (1924).

Contributor Notes

Manizheh Abdollahi is an Associate Professor of Persian literature and language in the Persian Department, Paramedical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, where she teaches Persian literature to medical students, as well as academic Persian writing to students of medical journalism and Old Persian medical texts to PhD students of traditional Persian medicine. E-mail: manijeh.abdolahi@gmail.com

Ehya Amalsaleh is an Associate Professor of TEFL in the English Department, Paramedical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. She has published a number of ESP textbooks for Iranian students. Her research interests lie in critical discourse analysis and methods of teaching writing. E-mail: asalehe@yahoo.com

  • Allamezade, S. (2015), ‘Killed by Love: ‘Eshqi Revised – an Iranian Poet’s Quest for Modernization’, in Persian Language, Literature and Culture: New Leaves, Fresh Looks, (ed.) K. Talattof (London: Routledge), 80102.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Anjuman-e Irānshenāsi-ye Farānsah (1998), Paydāyish-e rumān-e fārsi (Tehran: Enteshârâte Mo’in).

  • Azadibougar, O. (2014), ‘Translation Norms and the Importation of the Novel into Persian’, International Journal of Society, Culture and Language 2, no. 2: 89102.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bewes, T. and Hall, T. (eds) (2011), Georg Lukács: The Fundamental Dissonance of Existence: Aesthetics, Politics, Literature (London: Continuum).

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Brooks, P. (2015), ‘Foreword’, in The Mysteries of Paris, E. Sue (New York: Penguin), xiiixv.

  • Browne, E. G. (1959), A Literary History of Persia, Volume IV, Modern Times (1500–1924) (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).

  • Eco, U. (1967), ‘Rhetoric and Ideology in Sue’s Les Mystères de Paris’, International Social Sciences Journal 14, no. 4: 551569.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hagedorn, R. (1995), ‘Doubtless to Be Continued: A Brief History of Serial Narrative’, in To Be Continued …: Soap Operas Around the World, (ed.) R. C. Allen (London: Routledge), 2748.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Jamalzadeh, M. A. (1989), Once Upon a Time [Yeki Bud Yeki Nabud], (ed. and trans.) H. Moayyad and P. Sprachmann, Modern Persian Literature Series, no. 6 (New York: Bibliotheca Persica).

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Katouzian, H. (2002), Sadeq Hedayat: The Life and Literature of an Iranian Writer (London: I.B. Tauris).

  • Khorrami, M. M. (2003), ‘Toward a Literary Laboratory: Architectural Fluidity in Mandanipur’s Short Stories’, Edebiyat: Journal of Middle Eastern Literatures 13, no. 1: 1125.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Labov, W. (1972), ‘The Transformation of Experience in Narrative Syntax’, in Language in the Inner City, (ed.) W. Labov (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press), 354396.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Mirabedini, H. (2001), Sad Sal Dastan Nevisi dar Iran [One Hundred Years of Fiction Writing in Iran] [in Persian] (Tehran: Cheshmeh).

  • Moayyad, H. (2002), ‘The Persian Short Story: An Overview’, in Stories from Iran: An Anthology of Persian Short Fiction from 1921–1991, (ed.) H. Moayyad (Washington, D.C.: Mage), 1125.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Moshfeq-e Kazemi, M. (2013), Tehran-e Makhuf [Appalling Tehran] [in Persian] (Tehran: Omid-e Farda).

  • Pedersen, C. V. (2016), The Rise of the Persian Novel From the Constitutional Revolution to Rezâ Shâh 1910–1927 (Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag).

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Sue, E. (2000), Asrar-e Paris [Paris Secrets], (trans.) S. Hesabi and H. Adelpoor (Tehran: Kolbe).

  • Sue, E. (2015), The Mysteries of Paris [Les Mystères de Paris], (trans.) C. Betensky and J. Loesberg (New York: Penguin).

  • Tebyan (n.d.), Who wrote the first Persian novel?, www.tebyan.net/newmobile.aspx?pid=146300 (accessed 31 July 2016).

  • Yavari, H. (2006), ‘Afterword: Touba, A Woman for all Seasons’, in Touba and the Meaning of Night, Sh. Parsipur, (trans.) H. Houshmand and K. Talattof (New York: Feminist Press), 339360.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 19 19 3
Full Text Views 12 12 0
PDF Downloads 72 72 0