The Feminisation of Bulgarian Literature and the Club of Bulgarian Women Writers

in Volume 2 (2008): Issue 1 (Mar 2008): Women Writers and Intellectuals

This article considers the Club of Bulgarian Women Writers as a case study on the interrupted feminisation of twentieth-century Bulgarian belles-lettres and culture. It argues that the modernisation project of Bulgarian intellectuals in the interwar years led to an environment propitious for the emergence of a cohort of women literati who furthered women's emancipation, and generated an original and popular textual tradition. The Club, which existed between 1930 and 1949, was emblematic of the wide acceptance of women intellectuals in patriarchal monarchical Bulgaria, and their subsequent marginalisation in the post-war socialist republic. Having declared gender equality fulfilled, the communist regime considered literary interest in womanhood or the individual hostile to its social and political agenda. Interwar women intellectuals, whose very worldview demanded an unrestrained confluence of personal, female and intellectual identities, lost their social importance. Likewise, the Club and its members were excised from cultural and public memory until the 1990s.

Aspasia

The International Yearbook of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern European Women's and Gender History

in Volume 2 (2008): Issue 1 (Mar 2008): Women Writers and Intellectuals