A Generative Theory of Anticipation

Mood, Intuition and Imagination in Architectural Practice

in The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology
View More View Less
  • 1 University of California, Los Angeles c.stephan@ucla.edu
Restricted access

Abstract

In this article, I argue that anticipation unfolds within a range of experiential modalities. Because moods and emotions, intuitions and imagination, among other forms of experience, can all appear as disclosing something about the future, anticipation is heterogeneous. Building on work in phenomenological anthropology and philosophy, I offer a generative phenomenology of the range of anticipatory experience, arguing that some forms of experience are relatively more implicit while others may prove more salient and offer more explicable forms of anticipation. As anticipation emerges in time, the more implicit experiential modes such as mood and intuition operate as antecedents to more explicit ones such as imagination. Turning to apply these ideas to ethnographic materials from my fieldwork among architectural design teams in San Francisco, I demonstrate how attentiveness to this gradient of anticipatory experience allows us to account for anticipatory experiences as they unfold through time.

Contributor Notes

Christopher Stephan is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research examines experience design in health architecture, and intersubjectivity in religious practice. He is first author, along with C. Jason Throop, of ‘Phenomenological Analysis’ in the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of the Anthropology of Religion edited by Simon Coleman and Joel Robbins.

  • Bower, G. 1981. ‘Mood and Memory’. American Psychologist 36 (2): 129148.

  • Bucciarelli, L. 1994. Designing Engineers. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

  • Casey, E. S. 2000. Imagining: A Phenomenological Study. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

  • Csordas, T. 1990. ‘Embodiment as a Paradigm for Anthropology’. Ethos 18 (1): 547. https://doi.org/10.1525/eth.1990.18.1.02a00010.

  • Desjarlais, R. and C. J. Throop. 2011. ‘Phenomenological Approaches to Anthropology’. Annual Review of Anthropology 40: 87102. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-anthro-092010-153345.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gammeltoft, T. 2018. ‘Domestic Moods: Maternal Mental Health in Northern Vietnam’. Cross-Cultural Studies in Health and Illness 37 (7): 582596.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Geertz, C. 1973. The Interpretation of Cultures. New York: Basic Books.

  • Heidegger, M. 2010. Being and Time, trans. J. Stambaugh. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.

  • Husserl, E. 1983. Ideas Pertaining to a Pure Phenomenology and to a Phenomenological Philosophy, trans. F. Kersten. Boston, MA: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ingold, T. 2012. ‘Introduction: Perception of the User-Producer’. In W. Gunn and J. Donovan (eds), Design and Anthropology. Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing Company, 1933.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ingold, T. 2013. Making: Anthropology, Archaeology, Art and Architecture. New York: Routledge.

  • James, W. 1890. The Principles of Psychology. New York: Henry Holt.

  • Klein, G. 1999. Sources of Power: How People Make Decisions. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

  • Merleau-Ponty, M. 2012. The Phenomenology of Perception, trans. D. A. Landes. New York: Routledge.

  • Murphy, K. 2005. ‘Collaborative Imagining: The Interactive Use of Gestures, Talk, and Graphic Representation in Architectural Practice’. Semiotica 156 (1/4): 113145.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Murphy, K., J. Iversson and G. Lymer. 2012. ‘Embodied Reasoning in Architectural Critique’. Design Studies 33: 530556. doi:10.1016/j.destud.2012.06.005.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Radman, Z. (ed.). 2012. Knowing without Thinking: Mind, Action, Cognition, and the Phenomenon of the Background. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

  • Sartre, J.-P. 1992. Being and Nothingness, trans. H. H. Barnes. New York: Washington Square Press.

  • Schön, D. 1983. The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think in Action. New York: Basic Books.

  • Schutz, A. 1967. The Phenomenology of the Social World. Chicago, IL: Northwestern University Press.

  • Smith, S. and E. Vela. 2001. ‘Environmental Context-Dependent Memory: A Review and Meta-Analysis’. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 8 (2): 203220.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Throop, C. J. 2003. ‘Articulating Experience’. Anthropological Theory 3 (3): 219241. https://doi.org/10.1177/1463499603003002006.

  • Throop, C. J. 2009. ‘Intermediary Varieties of Experience’. Ethnos 74 (4): 535558. https://doi.org/10.1080/00141840903202116.

  • Throop, C. J. 2010. ‘In the Midst of Action’. In C. J. Throop and K. Murphy (eds), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2849.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Throop, C. J. 2014. ‘Moral Moods’. Ethos 42 (1): 6583. https://doi.org/10.1111/etho.12039.

  • Throop, C. J. 2017. ‘Despairing Moods: Worldly Attunements and Permeable Personhood in Yap’. Ethos 45 (2): 199215. https://doi.org/10.1111/etho.12163.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Zahavi, D. 2003. Husserl's Phenomenology. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

  • Zahavi, D. 2008. Subjectivity and Selfhood: Investigating the First-Person Perspective. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 78 78 7
Full Text Views 54 54 0
PDF Downloads 64 64 0