Afterword

in Conflict and Society
Author: Peter Hervik1
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  • 1 Aalborg University hervik@cgs.aau.dk
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Abstract

This afterword offers reflections on some major points of this section concerning the generative power linking moral outrage to political violence. The authors have successfully taken up a topic of immense relevance and urgency in contemporary society. Their efforts are a first important step to address this from an empirical, analytical, and theoretical framework. In the afterword, I seek to add further perspectives to some of the findings, including a focus on moral outrage that situates it not strictly within personality as a preexisting universal that waits for someone to wake it up but rather in an approach to emotions as embedded within cultural understandings with an emphasis on the strategic side of the production of moral outrage in creating both positive and negative change.

Contributor Notes

PETER HERVIK is an anthropologist and Associate Professor of Migration Studies in the Department of Culture and Global Studies at Aalborg University. He holds a PhD in social anthropology from the University of Copenhagen and taught international migration and ethnic relations at Malmö University. He has conducted research among the Yucatec Maya of Mexico and on the representation in the news media of religious and ethnic minorities in Denmark, particularly themes of radical right-wing populism, neonationalism, neoracism, ethnicization, Islamophobia, and related issues. Email: hervik@cgs.aau.dk

Conflict and Society

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