Conflict and Society

Advances in Research

Editor in Chief
Erella Grassiani, University of Amsterdam
Assistant Editor
Dastan Abdali, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Editors
Tessa Diphoorn, Utrecht University
Alexander Horstmann, Tallinn University
Thijs Jeursen, Utrecht University 
Linda Musariri, University of Amsterdam; University of Witwatersrand
Lotte Buch Segal, University of Edinburgh
Atreyee Sen, University of Copenhagen
Henrik Vigh, University of Copenhagen


Subjects: Peace and Conflict Studies


Call for Papers: Special Issue 2022 - Institutionalized Racism in Everyday Policing

Latest Issue Table of Contents

Volume 7 (2021): Issue 1 (Jun 2021)

Volume 7 / 2021, 1 issue per volume (summer)

Aims & Scope

Organized violence—war, armed revolt, genocide, lynching, targeted killings, torture, routine discrimination, terrorism, trauma, and suffering—is a daily reality for some, while for others it is a sound bite or a news clip seen in passing and easily forgotten. Rigorous scholarly research of the social and cultural conditions of organized violence, its genesis, dynamic, and impact, is fundamental to addressing questions of local and global conflict and its impact on the human condition.

Publishing peer-reviewed articles by international scholars, Conflict and Society expands the field of conflict studies by using ethnographic inquiry to establish new fields of research and interdisciplinary collaboration. An opening special section presents general articles devoted to a topic or region followed by a section featuring conceptual debates on key problems in the study of organized violence. Review articles and topical overviews offer navigational assistance across the vast and varied terrain of conflict research, and comprehensive reviews of new books round out each volume. With special attention paid to ongoing debates on the politics and ethics of conflict studies research, including military-academic cooperation, Conflict and Society is an essential forum for scholars, researchers, and policy makers in the fields of anthropology, sociology, political science, and development studies.


Indexing/Abstracting

Conflict and Society is indexed/abstracted in:

  • European Reference Index for the Humanities and Social Sciences (ERIH PLUS)
  • IBR – International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences (De Gruyter)
  • IBZ – International Bibliography of Periodical Literature (De Gruyter)
  • Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, Series and Publishers
  • Scopus (Elsevier)

Editor in Chief
Erella Grassiani, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Assistant Editor
Dastan Abdali, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Editors
Tessa Diphoorn, Utrecht University, The Netherlands 
Alexander Horstmann, Tallinn University, Estonia
Thijs Jeursen, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Linda Musariri, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands; University of Witwatersrand, South Africa
Lotte Buch Segal, University of Edinburgh, UK
Atreyee Sen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Henrik Vigh, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Advisory Board
Arjun Appadurai, New York University, USA
Thomas Hylland Eriksen, University of Oslo, Norway
Hugh Gusterson, University of British Columbia, Canada
Michael Jackson, Harvard University, USA
Stef Jansen, University of Manchester, UK
Keith Krause, Centre on Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding, Switzerland
Catherine Lutz, Brown University, USA
Nayanika Mookherjee, Durham University, UK
Yael Navaro-Yashin, University of Cambridge, UK
Iver B. Neumann, Norwegian Institute of International Affairs, Norway
Carolyn Nordstrom, University of Notre Dame, USA
Ton Robben, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
Robert Rubinstein, Syracuse University, USA
 

 

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As part of the Berghahn Open Anthro initiative, articles in Conflict and Society: Advances in Research (ARCS) are published open access under a Creative Commons license.

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Ethics Statement

Authors published in Conflict and Society: Advances in Research (ARCS) certify that their works are original and their own. The editors certify that all materials, with the possible exception of editorial introductions, book reviews, and some types of commentary, have been subjected to blind peer review by qualified scholars in the field. While the publishers and the editorial board make every effort to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions, or statements appear in this journal, they wish to make clear that the data and opinions appearing in the articles herein are the sole responsibility of the contributor concerned. For a more detailed explanation concerning these qualifications and responsibilities, please see the complete ARCS ethics statement.

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Departheid

The Draconian Governance of Illegalized Migrants in Western States

Author: Barak Kalir

Abstract

This article proposes the term Departheid to capture the systemic oppression and spatial management of illegalized migrants in Western liberal states. As a concept, Departheid aims to move beyond the instrumentality of illegalizing migration in order to comprehend the tenacity with which oppressive measures are implemented even in the face of accumulating evidence for their futility in managing migration flows and the harm they cause to millions of people. The article highlights continuities between present oppressive migration regimes and past colonial configurations for controlling the mobility of what Hannah Arendt has called “subject races.” By drawing on similarities with Apartheid as a governing ideology based on racialization, segregation, and deportation, I argue that Departheid, too, is animated by a sense of moral superiority that is rooted in a fantasy of White supremacy.

Author: Finn Stepputat

This article discusses the recent revision of the notion of sovereignty that emphasizes de facto rather than de jure sovereignty, understanding sovereignty as an effect of performative claims to sovereignty. As an implication of this approach, we come to see political landscapes as formed by multiple, overlapping, coexisting, and sometimes competing claims to sovereignty operating within and across boundaries. The article suggests using “formations of sovereignty” as a way of understanding these political landscapes and the way they change over time in specific areas. Empirically, the article analyzes different formations of sovereignty in a Guatemalan municipality at the border with Mexico, from before the civil war of the early 1980s to the present.

First as Tragedy, Then as Teleology

The Politics/People Dichotomy in the Ethnography of Post-Yugoslav Nationalization

Author: Stef Jansen

ABSTRACT

Ethnographers working in Bosnia and Herzegovina have been at the forefront of the struggle against the identitarianism that dominates scholarship and policymaking regarding the country. Tirelessly foregrounding patterns of life that exceed, contradict, complicate or are oblivious to questions thus framed, we have—unsurprisingly—paid a price for this contribution: explorations of the appeal of nationalism are left mostly to others. This article identifies an emic and etic politics/people paradigm that facilitates our timidity to register the ways in which “ordinary people” may enact nationalist subjectivity. Seeking to retain the paradigm’s strengths, I call for a recalibration of how we understand it to function and explore conceptual tools to make this work. Starting from two cases of “foot soldier narratives,” I suggest that hegemony theory can help us trace not only how people are subjected to nationalization but also how they may seek subjectification through it.

Introduction

Ethnographic Engagement with Bureaucratic Violence

Abstract

Bureaucracies are dynamic and interactive sociocultural worlds that drive knowledge production, power inequalities and subsequent social struggle, and violence. The authors featured in this special section mobilize their ethnographic data to examine bureaucracies as animated spaces where violence, whether physical, structural, or symbolic, manifests in everyday bureaucratic practices and relationships. The articles span geographic contexts (e.g., United States, Canada, Chile, Eritrea) and topics (e.g., migration, extractive economies, law and sociolegal change, and settler colonialism) but are bound together in their investigation of the violence of the administration of decisions, care, and control through bureaucratic means.

Shadow Soldiering

Shifting Constellations and Permeable Boundaries in “Private” Security Contracting

ABSTRACT

Contemporary warfare depends on private security contractors from countries in the Global South. In Sierra Leone, this dependency has produced emerging markets for private military and security companies (PMSCs) seeking to recruit cheap, military-experienced labor. This article explores how demobilized militia and soldiers in Sierra Leone negotiate categorical divides to make themselves employable for private security contracting in Iraq. Based on 19 months of fieldwork tracing militia soldiers as they move between shifting security constellations, the article introduces the notion of “shadow soldiering” to explain the entanglements of public-private spheres and the blurring of boundaries between the visible and invisible that characterize these constellations. While scholarly work on PMSCs has increasingly highlighted the public-private interconnectedness, the article contributes an ethnographically informed perspective on how security contractors on the ground interpret such entanglements and how global security dynamics intersects with the local, everyday practices and processes that facilitate the supply of contractors.