Globalizing the Intellectual History of Democracy

in Democratic Theory
View More View Less
  • 1 Yale Law School, Yale University, USA samuel.moyn@yale.edu
  • 2 University of Canberra, Australia jean-paul.gagnon@canberra.edu.au
Restricted access

Interview in Brief

Samuel Moyn provides insight into how the history of democracy can continue its globalization. There is a growing belief that the currently acceptable fund of ideas has not served the recent past well which is why an expansion, a planetary one, of democracy's ideas is necessary – especially now as we move deeper into the shadow of declining American/Western imperialism and ideology. Deciding which of democracy's intellectual traditions to privilege is driven by a mix of forced necessity and choice: finding salient ground for democracy is likely only possible in poisoned traditions including European ones.

Contributor Notes

Samuel Moyn is Henry R. Luce Professor of Jurisprudence at Yale Law School, Professor of History at Yale University and fellow of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft. Recent publications include “The Court is Not Your Friend” in Dissent (2020) and Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World published by Harvard University Press (2018). Areas of research interest include 20th century European moral and political theory but also international law, human rights, the law of war, and legal thought in both historical and current perspectives. E-mail: samuel.moyn@yale.edu

Jean-Paul Gagnon is senior lecturer in democracy studies at the University of Canberra and faculty affiliate of the Centre for Deliberative Democracy and Global Governance. Jean-Paul edits the Berghahn (Oxford, New York) journal Democratic Theory and the Palgrave Macmillan book series on the Theories, Concepts and Practices of Democracy which has just published its 12th title. He directs the fledgling Foundation for the Philosophy of Democracy (141006.io/ http://tiny.cc/5g8siz). ORCID: 0000-0003-3234-7319. E-mail: jean-paul.gagnon@canberra.edu.au

Democratic Theory

An Interdisciplinary Journal

  • Blackhawk, Ned and Isaiah Lorado Wilner. 2018. Indigenous Visions: Rediscovering the World of Franz Boas. New Have: Yale University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Breckman, Warren. 2013. Adventures of the Symbolic: Post-Marxism and Radical Democracy. New York: Columbia University Press.

  • Cooper, Frederick. 2013. “How Do We Want Our Intellectual History to Be?” In Samuel Moyn and Andrew Sartori (eds), Global Intellectual History. New York: Columbia University Press. Pp. 283294.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Dallmayr, Fred. 2017. Democracy to Come: Politics as Relational Praxis. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  • Fargher, Lane, Richard Blanton, and Verenice Y Heredia Espinoza. 2010. “Egalitarian Ideology and Political Power in Prehispanic Central Mexico: The Case of Tlaxcallan”. Latin American Antiquity 21 (3): 227251.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Fargher, Lane, Richard Blanton, Verenice Y Heredia Espinoza, John Millhauser, Nazahualcoyotl Xiuhtecutli. 2011. “Tlaxcallan: The Archaeology of an Ancient Republic in the New World”. Antiquity 85 (327): 172186.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gagnon, Jean-Paul. 2018. “2,234 Descriptions of Democracy: An Update to Democracy's Ontological Pluralism”. Democratic Theory 5(1): 92113.

  • King, Charles. 2019. Gods of the Upper Air: How A Circle of Renegade Anthropologists Reinvented Race, Sex and Gender in the Twentieth Century. New York: Doubleday.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kliger, Gili. 2019. “The Critical Bite of Cultural Relativism”. Boston Review, available online: http://bostonreview.net/philosophy-religion/gili-kliger-critical-bite-cultural-relativism.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lefort, Claude. 1988. Democracy and Political Theory. Translated by David Macey. Cambridge: Polity.

  • Lefort, Claude. 2007. Complications: Communism and the Dilemmas of Democracy. Translated by Julian Bourg. New York: Columbia University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Moyn, Samuel. 2010. The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History. Cambridge, Mass: Belknap.

  • Moyn, Samuel and Andrew Sartori (eds). 2013. Global Intellectual History. New York: Columbia University Press.

  • Moyn, Samuel. 2014. “Plural Cosmopolitanisms and the Origins of Human Rights”. In Costas Douzinas and Conor Gearty (eds), The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Moyn, Samuel. 2018. Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World. Cambridge: Belknap Press.

  • Stuurman, Siep. 2013. “Common Humanity and Cultural Difference on the Sedentary-Nomadic Frontier: Herodotus, Sima Qian and Ibn Khaldun”. In Samuel Moyn and Andrew Sartori (eds), Global Intellectual History. New York: Columbia University Press. Pp. 3358.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wolin, Sheldon. 2016. Fugitive Democracy: And Other Essays. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 210 210 52
Full Text Views 164 164 3
PDF Downloads 155 155 0