Environment and Society

Advances in Research

Founding Editors:
Paige West, Columbia University
Dan Brockington,
 University of Sheffield

Editors:
Amelia Moore, University of Rhode Island
Jerry Jacka, University of Colorado Boulder


Subjects: Environmental Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, Geography


CALL FOR PAPERS
Volume 13. Thematic Focus: Global Black Ecologies

 

Latest Issue Table of Contents

Volume 11 (2020): Issue 1 (Sep 2020): Oceans

Volume 12 / 2021, 1 issue per volume (autumn)

Aims & Scope

Environment and Society: Advances in Research is an annual review journal, publishing articles that have been commissioned in response to specific published calls.

The field of research on environment and society is growing rapidly and becoming of ever-greater importance not only in academia but also in policy circles and for the public at large. This growth reflects the urgency of debate and the pace and scale of change with respect to the water crisis, deforestation, biodiversity loss, the looming energy crisis, nascent resource wars, environmental refugees, climate change, and environmental justice, which are just some of the many compelling challenges facing society today and in the future. It also reflects the richness and insights of scholarship exploring diverse cultural forms, social phenomena, and political-economic formations in which society and nature are intricately intertwined, if not indistinguishable.

As a forum to address these issues, we are delighted to present an important peer-reviewed annual: Environment and Society: Advances in Research. Through this journal we hope to stimulate advanced research and action on these and other critical issues and encourage international communication and exchange among all relevant disciplines.

Environment and Society publishes critical reviews of the latest research literature on environmental studies, including subjects of theoretical, methodological, substantive, and applied significance. Articles also survey the literature regionally and thematically and reflect the work of anthropologists, geographers, environmental scientists, and human ecologists from all parts of the world in order to internationalize the conversations within environmental anthropology, environmental geography, and other environmentally oriented social sciences. The publication will appeal to academic, research, and policy-making audiences alike.


Indexing/Abstracting

Environment and Society: Advances in Research is indexed/abstracted in:

  • Bibliometric Research Indicator List (BFI)
  • Emerging Sources Citation Index (Web of Science)
  • CAB Abstracts (CABI Publishing)
  • Environmental Studies and Policy (Gale)
  • European Reference Index for the Humanities and the Social Sciences (ERIH PLUS)
  • Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, Series and Publishers
  • Scopus (Elsevier)

Introducing: EnviroSociety, a multimedia site that provides insights into contemporary socio-ecological issues with posts from top scholars in the social sciences that engage readers interested in current environmental topics.

Founding Editors
Paige West, Columbia University, USA
Dan Brockington, University of Sheffield, UK

Editors
Amelia Moore, University of Rhode Island, USA
Jerry Jacka, University of Colorado Boulder, USA

Book Review Editors
Rebecca Witter, Appalachian State University, USA
Patrick Gallagher, University of Texas, San Antonio, USA

Managing Editor
Gregorio Ortiz, University of Colorado Boulder, USA

Editorial Advisory Board
Vanessa Agard-Jones, Columbia University, USA
Monica Barra, University of South Carolina, USA
Dominic Boyer, Rice University, USA
James G. Carrier, Independent Scholar
Clint Carroll, University of Colorado Boulder, USA
Noel Castree, University of Wollongong, Australia
Lisa Cliggett, University of Kentucky, USA
Molly Doane, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
Robert Fletcher, University of Florida, USA
Scott Freeman, American University, USA
Elizabeth Hoover, University of California, Berkeley USA
Jeff Kinch, National Fisheries College, Papua New Guinea
Laura Mentore, University of Mary Washington, USA
Sarah Milne, Australian National University, Australia
Marama Muru-Lanning, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Katja Neves, Concordia University, USA
Nicole Peterson, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, USA
Kimberly Tallbear, University of Alberta, Canada
Sarah Vaughn, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Jerry Zee, University of California, Santa Cruz, USA
Ariela Zycherman, United States Department of Agriculture, USA

 

Manuscript Submission

Please review the submission and style guide carefully before submitting.

Environment and Society: Advances in Research (ARES) is an annual review journal, publishing articles that have been commissioned in response to specific published calls. Its articles are meant to review substantial bodies of literature that have appeared in previous years. Contributions should contain substantial literature reviews, however, the strongest articles tend to include some original material.

All submitted articles should be original works and not concurrently under consideration by any other publication. Please send submissions of articles, reviews, and other contributions as Microsoft Word or Rich Text Format (rtf) files by e-mail to the editors at ares.journal@gmail.com.

Articles should be 8,000 to 10,000 words (including endnotes and references) and include a 150-word abstract and 6 to 8 keywords. The manuscript files should be formatted as US letter, with 1-inch margins, double-spacing, 12-point Times New Roman font for all text, and no extra spaces between paragraphs.

Have other questions? Please refer to the Berghahn Info for Authors page for general information and guidelines including topics such as article usage and permissions for Berghahn journal article authors.


License Agreement

As part of the Berghahn Open Anthro initiative, articles in Environment and Society: Advances in Research (ARES) are published open access under a Creative Commons license.

Authors must visit our License Options page to select and download their preferred license agreement. Completed and signed forms should be sent to copyright@berghahnjournals.com.


Ethics Statement

Authors published in Environment and Society: Advances in Research (ARES) certify that their works are original and their own. The editors certify that all materials, with the possible exception of editorial introductions, book reviews, and some types of commentary, have been subjected to blind peer review by qualified scholars in the field. While the publishers and the editorial board make every effort to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions, or statements appear in this journal, they wish to make clear that the data and opinions appearing in the articles herein are the sole responsibility of the contributor concerned. For a more detailed explanation concerning these qualifications and responsibilities, please see the complete ARES ethics statement.

Annual Subscriptions

Volume 12/2021, 1 issue p.a. (autumn) 
ISSN 2150-6779 (Print) • ISSN 2150-6787 (Online)
(rates include handling & surface postage)

Free Sample Issue
Recommend to Your Library

Subscribe/Renew

Contact Berghahn or your subscription agent to subscribe/renew:
orders@berghahnjournals.com

2021 Pricing

*Price freeze at 2020 rates

Institutional Rate (Print & Online)
$200.00 / £129.00 / €159.00

Institutional Rate (Online Only)
$180.00 / £116.00 / €143.00

Individual Rate (Online Only)
$34.95 / £22.95 / €30.00

Student Rate (Online Only)
$19.95 / £13.95 / €15.95* 
*must include valid student ID

Print & Online for individual subscriptions are available. Please contact Berghahn for pricing.

Single issues:
Contact Berghahn for pricing and availability.


Please direct all inquiries regarding subscription to orders@berghahnjournals.com

Berghahn Journals Subscriptions
c/o Berghahn Books
20 Jay Street, Suite 502
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Phone: 212-233-6004


Don't have a subscription? Find other ways to access the journal here, or recommend the journal to your library.


Environment and Society is a part of the Berghahn Open Anthro subscribe-to-open initiative. Launched in 2020, this pilot has successfully converted a collection of 13 anthropology journals to full Open Access using S2O as its equitable and sustainable model of choice.

Animals, Plants, People, and Things

A Review of Multispecies Ethnography

This article defines multispecies ethnography and links this scholarship to broader currents within academia, including in the biosciences, philosophy, political ecology, and animal welfare activism. The article is organized around a set of productive tensions identified in the review of the literature. It ends with a discussion of the “ethnographic” in multispecies ethnography, urging ethnographers to bring a “speculative wonder” to their mode of inquiry and writing.

Neoliberalism and the Biophysical Environment

A Synthesis and Evaluation of the Research

Author: Noel Castree

This article both synthesizes and critically evaluates a now large, multi-disciplinary body of published research that examines the neoliberalization of environmental regulation, management, and governance. Since the late 1970s, neoliberal ideas and ideals have gradually made their way into the domain of environmental policy as part of a wider change in the global political economy. While the volume of empirical research is now such that we can draw some conclusions about this policy shift, the fact that the research has evolved piecemeal across so many different disciplines has made identifying points of similarity and difference in the findings more difficult. After clarifying what neoliberalism is and explaining why the term 'neoliberalization' is preferable, the article analyzes the principal components and enumerates the social and environmental effects of this multifaceted process. By offering a comprehensive and probing survey of the salient literature, I hope not only to codify the existing research but also to guide future critical inquiries into neoliberal environmental policy.

Adaptation--Genuine and Spurious

Demystifying Adaptation Processes in Relation to Climate Change

In climate change discourse and policy, adaptation has become a critical byword and frame of reference. An implicit assumption in much of the strategizing is the notion that adaptation can be rationally planned, funded, and governed largely through existing frameworks. But can adaptation really be managed or engineered, especially given the significant unpredictability and severe impacts that are forecast in a range of climate scenarios? Over millennia, successful societies have adapted to climate shifts, but evidence suggests that this was often accomplished only through wide-ranging reorganization or the institution of new measures in the face of extreme environmental stress. This essay critically examines the concept of human adaptation by dividing it into eight fundamental processes and viewing each in a broad cultural, ecological, and evolutionary context. We focus our assessment especially on northern indigenous peoples, who exist at the edges of present-day climate governance frameworks but at the center of increasingly acute climate stress.

Contradictions in Tourism

The Promise and Pitfalls of Ecotourism as a Manifold Capitalist Fix

This article reviews an interdisciplinary literature exploring the relationship between tourism and capitalism focused on ecotourism in particular. One of this literature's most salient features is to highlight ecotourism's function in employing capitalist mechanisms to address problems of capitalist development itself by attempting to resolve a series of contradictions intrinsic to the accumulation process, including: economic stagnation due to overaccumulation (time/space x); growing inequality and social unrest (social x); limitations on capital accumulation resulting from ecological degradation (environmental x); a widespread sense of alienation between humans and nonhuman natures; and a loss of “enchantment“ due to capitalist rationalization. Hence, widespread advocacy of ecotourism as a “panacea“ for diverse social and environmental ills can be interpreted as an implicit endorsement of its potential as a manifold capitalist x as well. The article concludes by outlining a number of possible directions for future research suggested by this review.

Author: Rebecca Lave

In order for nature/society scholars to understand the dynamics of environmental appropriation, commercialization, and privatization, we must attend to the production of the environmental science that enables them. Case studies from anthropology, geography, history of science, science and technology studies, and sociology demonstrate that the neoliberal forces whose application we study and contest are also changing the production of environmental knowledge claims both inside and outside the university. Neoliberalism's core epistemological claim about the market's superiority as information processor has made restructuring the university a surprisingly central project. Further, because knowledge has become a key site of capital accumulation, the transformative reach of neoliberal science regimes extends outside the university into the various forms of extramural science, such as citizen science, crowdsourcing, indigenous knowledge, and local knowledge. Neoliberal science regimes' impacts on these forms of extramural science are strikingly similar, and quite different from the most common consequences within academia.