Albert H. Friedlander

An American Appreciation

in European Judaism
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  • 1 Vanderbilt Divinity School, Graduate Department of Religion, and Program in Jewish Studies, USA
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Abstract

The work of Rabbi Albert Friedlander is less known in US contexts than it should be, especially since it still has much to contribute to both Jewish communal relationships and dialogue between Jews and Christians. From the perspective of an American academic, this article focuses on his chaplaincy work in the context of competing forms of Jewish orthodoxy and orthopraxy; the impact of the Shoah on his understanding of and response to US racism; his approach to Jewish–Christian relations by celebrating accomplishment rather than bewailing what is left to be done; and his concern for reconciliatory rather than agonist learning in which one seeks insights even in work with which one disagrees.

Contributor Notes

Amy-Jill Levine is University Professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies and Mary Jane Werthan Professor of Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt Divinity School, Graduate Department of Religion, and Program in Jewish Studies in Nashville, TN, USA. She is also affiliated faculty, Woolf Institute, Cambridge. In spring 2019 she became the first Jew to teach a New Testament course at the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome.

European Judaism

A Journal for the New Europe