Imagining Alternative Spaces

Re-searching Sexualized Violence with Indigenous Girls in Canada

in Girlhood Studies
Author:
Anna Chadwick School of Child and Youth Care, University of Victoria annachadwick007@gmail.com

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Abstract

“Sisters Rising” is an Indigenous-led, community-based research study focused on Indigenous teachings related to sovereignty and gender wellbeing. In this article, I reflect on the outcomes of re-searching sexualized violence with Indigenous girls involved with “Sisters Rising” in remote communities in northern British Columbia, Canada. Through an emergent methodology that draws from Indigenous and borderland feminisms to conduct arts- and land-based workshops with girls and community members, I seek to unsettle my relationships to the communities with which I work, and the land on which I work. I look to arts-based methods and witnessing to disrupt traditional hegemonic discourses of settler colonialism. I reflect on how (re)storying spaces requires witnessing that incorporates (self-)critical engagement that destabilizes certainty. This position is a critical space in which to unsettle conceptual and physical geographies and envision alternative spaces where Indigenous girls are seen and heard with dignity and respect.

Contributor Notes

Anna Chadwick (ORCID: 0000-0002-7297-0538) has been working as a child and youth art therapist in northern British Columbia for the past fourteen years. She is currently working as a therapist in Victoria BC for children and youth who have experienced sexualized violence and is also a graduate student at the School of Child and Youth Care, University of Victoria. Under the supervision of Dr. Sandrina de Finney, she is a principal investigator of the project, “Sisters Rising” that focuses on challenging the victim-blaming climate of racialized gender and sexualized violence by recentering Indigenous values. Email: annachadwick007@gmail.com

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