Towards a Fairer Future

An Activist Model of Black Girl Leadership

in Girlhood Studies
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  • 1 University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Towson University; Trinity Washington University (USA) clcook@towson.edu
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Abstract

In the study on which this article is based, I examine the correlation between the number of Black girls in leadership programs and the number of Black female leaders in nonprofit organizations. I carried out research on Black girl leadership to understand the shortcomings of programs meant to teach Black girls appropriate leadership skills and I conducted interviews with female leaders to determine the hurdles faced by Black women trying to obtain leadership roles in the nonprofit sector. My findings show that there is a disconnect between Black and white women in leadership roles and that impediments for Black women affect leadership prospects for Black girls. This article is a call to create an activist model that supports the professional trajectories of Black girls.

Contributor Notes

Courtney Cook (ORCID: 0000-0001-9488-6495) is an Adjunct Professor in Women‘s Studies and Philosophy at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Towson University, and Trinity Washington University. She has a Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies from the University of Maryland, College Park and an M.S. in Nonprofit Management from the New School for Public Engagement. Her research interests include Black girlhood, the intersections of race, gender, and class, and the cultural impact of media on race and gender. Email: clcook@towson.edu

Girlhood Studies

An Interdisciplinary Journal

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