Where are all the Girls and Indigenous People at IGSA@ND?

in Girlhood Studies
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  • 1 Saskatoon, Canada
  • 2 Young Indigenous Women's Utopia Group, Canada
  • 3 Young Indigenous Women's Utopia Group, Canada
  • 4 University of Windsor, Canada catherine.vanner@uwindsor.ca
  • 5 York University, Canada flicker@yorku.ca
  • 6 Educator and community scholar, Canada jaltenberg@gscs.ca
  • 7 Indigenous feminist scholar, Canada kdwutt@gmail.com
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Abstract

We adopt an autoethnographic approach to share critical reflections from the Young Indigenous Women's Utopia girls’ group about our experiences attending the 2019 International Girlhood Studies Association conference at the University of Notre Dame (IGSA@ND). Moments of inspiration included sharing our work and connecting with local Indigenous youth. Challenging moments included feeling isolated and excluded since the only girls present at the conference were Indigenous people in colonial spaces. We conclude with reflection questions and recommendations to help future conference organizers and participants think through the politics and possibilities of meaningful expanded stakeholder inclusion at academic meetings.

Contributor Notes

The Young Indigenous Women‘s Utopia Group is an award-winning girl group located in Saskatoon that challenges gender-based and colonial violence using Indigenous and arts-based methods.

Cindy Moccasin is a proud member of the Young Indigenous Women's Utopia from Saulteaux First Nation.

Jessica Mcnab is a proud member of the Young Indigenous Women's Utopia from George Gordon First Nation.

Catherine Vanner (ORCID: 0000-0002-7303-942X) is a settler Canadian and an Assistant Professor of Educational Foundations at the University of Windsor. Email: catherine.vanner@uwindsor.ca

Sarah Flicker (ORCID: 0000-0001-6202-5519) is a settler Canadian and professor in the Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change at York University. Email: Flicker@yorku.ca

Jennifer Altenberg is a Michif woman, educator, and community scholar. Email: JAltenberg@gscs.ca

Kari-Dawn Wuttunee is nêhiyaw-iskwêw Indigenous feminist from Red Pheasant Cree Nation. Email: kdwutt@gmail.com

Girlhood Studies

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