Renewed Possibilities

Showcasing the Lived Realities of Black Girls using Ethnopoetics

in Girlhood Studies
Author:
Dywanna SmithSchool of Education, Claflin University, USA dysmith@claflin.edu

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Abstract

In this article, I explore how ethnopoetics can be a profound research methodology and can also offer a pathway to self-actualization. When ethnopoetics is combined with a Black feminist/womanist theoretical framework, it allows for Black girls to self-define and self-validate their existence. The verse novel provides an opportunity to communicate Black girls’ and women's feelings and experiences to researchers and educators in accessible ways. It also serves as a platform to grieve, praise, love, and grow. Such work stands in marked contrast to dominant narratives of Black girlhood.

Contributor Notes

Dywanna Smith (ORCID: 0000-0002-5564-0705) is an Assistant Professor in the School of Education at Claflin University. Her research focuses on examining the intersections of race, literacies, and education along with equipping teachers with equity pedagogies to successfully teach linguistically and culturally diverse students. Smith's work is grounded in ethnopoetics. She uses poetry to speak to the realities of Black girls and women and to resist and respond to racism, sexism, sizism, and misogynoir. She has presented on these topics nationally and internationally. Email:dysmith@claflin.edu

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