“Honestly, Anywhere that I Have Wi-Fi”

A Posthuman Approach to Young Women's Activist Blogging

in Girlhood Studies
Author:
Lindsay C. Sheppard PhD Student, York University, Canada lshepp@yorku.ca

Search for other papers by Lindsay C. Sheppard in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3109-3484
and
Rebecca Raby Brock University, Canada rraby@ brocku.ca

Search for other papers by Rebecca Raby in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7830-2960
Restricted access

Abstract

We add to the scholarship on young women's online activism using a Baradian framework to explore the material-discursive contexts that co-create the meanings and possibilities of their activism. Through a diffractive methodology, we delve into key moments from blogs and interviews with bloggers to discuss two emerging themes. First, we offer an understanding of activist girl blogger subjectivities as intra-actively embedded and remade in material-discursive contexts of girlhood, artist, and celebrity in a neoliberal digital culture that valorizes social media influencers. Second, we examine the related entanglements of discourses-materialities-time-space-bodies, and the human and non-human agencies that co-constitute young women's activist blogging. Overall, we illustrate the potential of a Baradian approach for understanding the human and more-than-human complexities of young women's activist blogging and activist subjectivities.

Contributor Notes

Lindsay C. Sheppard (ORCID: 0000-0003-3109-3484) is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at York University, Canada. She explores intersections of girlhood and activism in on/offline spaces, art activism, agency, and young people's participation. Email: lshepp@yorku.ca

Rebecca Raby (ORCID: 0000-0002-7830-2960) is a sociologist in the Department of Child and Youth Studies, Brock University, Canada. She studies constructions of childhood and youth, intersecting inequalities in young lives, and theories of participation and agency. Email: rraby@brocku.ca

  • Collapse
  • Expand

Girlhood Studies

An Interdisciplinary Journal

  • Baczewska, Evelina, Maria Frances Cachon, Yvette Daniel, and Erwin Dimitri Selimos. 2018. “Mapping the Terrain of Strategic Politics among Social Change-Oriented Youth.” Journal of Youth Studies 21 (3): 288303. https://doi.org/10.1080/13676261.2017.1366649.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Barad, Karen. 2003. “Posthumanist Performativity: Toward an Understanding of How Matter Comes to Matter.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 28 (3): 801831.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Barad, Karen. 2007. Meeting the Universe Halfway: Quantum Physics and the Entanglement of Matter and Meaning. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bent, Emily. 2020. “This is Not Another Girl-Power Story: Reading Emma González as a Public Feminist Intellectual.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 45 (4): 795816. https://doi.org/10.1086/707796.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cabrera, Nolan L., Cheryl E. Matias, and Roberto Montoya. 2017. “Activism or Slacktivism? The Potential and Pitfalls of Social Media in Contemporary Student Activism.” Journal of Diversity in Higher Education 10 (4): 400415. https://doi.org/10.1037/dhe0000061.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Crenshaw, Kimberlé Williams. 1994. “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics and Violence Against Women of Colour.” In Public Nature of Private Violence, ed. Martha Fineman and Rixanne Mykitiuk, 93118. New York: Routledge.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Dejmanee, Tisha. 2018. “Popular Feminism and Teen Girl Fashion Blogs.” Continuum 32 (3): 34554. https://doi.org/10.1080/10304312.2018.1430744.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Edell, Dana, Lyn Mikel Brown, and Celeste Montano. 2016. “Bridges, Ladders, Sparks, and Glue: Celebrating and Problematizing “Girl-Driven” Intergenerational Feminist Activism.” Feminist Media Studies 16 (4): 693709. http://doi.org/10.1080/14680777.2016.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Erz, Antonia, and Anna-Bertha Heeris Christensen. 2018. “Transforming Consumers into Brands: Tracing Transformation Processes of the Practice of Blogging.” Journal of Interactive Marketing 43: 6982. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intmar.2017.12.002.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Fox, Nick J, and Pam Allred. 2017. Sociology and the New Materialism: Theory, Research, Action. London: SAGE.

  • Fullam, Jordan. 2017. “Becoming a Youth Activist in the Internet Age: A Case Study on Social Media Activism and Identity Development.” International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education 30 (4): 406422. https://doi.org/10.1080/09518398.2016.1250176.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gabriel, Deborah. 2016. “Blogging While Black, British and Female: A Critical Study on Discursive Activism.” Information, Communication & Society 19 (11): 16221635. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2016.1146784.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Garcia, Chloe Krystyna, and Ayesha Vemuri. 2017. “Girls and Young Women Resisting Rape Culture through YouTube Videos.” Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 10 (2): 2644. https://doi.org/10.3167/ghs.2017.100204.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gordon, Hava R, and Jessica K. Taft. 2011. “Rethinking Youth Political Socialization: Teenage Activists Talk Back.” Youth & Society 43 (4): 14991527. https://doi.org/10.1177/0044118X10386087.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Guillard, Julianne. 2016. “Is Feminism Trending? Pedagogical Approaches to Countering (Sl)Activism.” Gender and Education 28 (5): 609626. https://doi.org/10.1080/09540253.2015.1123227.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Harris, Anita. 2004. Future Girls: Young Women in the Twenty-First Century. New York Routledge.

  • Herrero-Diz, Paula, and Marina Ramos-Serrano. 2018. “Breaking Stereotypes Online: Young Activists’ Use of the Internet for Social Well-Being.” Catalan Journal of Communication & Cultural Studies 10 (1): 99114. https://doi.org/10.1386/cjcs.10.1.991.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hill, Sarah. 2017. “Exploring Disabled Girls’ Self-Representational Practices Online.” Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 10 (2): 114130. https://doi.org/10.3167/ghs.2017.100209.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Jackson, Sue. 2018. “Young Feminists, Feminism and Digital Media.” Feminism & Psychology 28 (1): 3249. https://doi.org/10.1177/0959353517716952.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kahne, Joseph, Erica, Hodgin, and Elyse Eidman-Aadahl, E. 2016. “Redesigning Civic Education for the Digital Age: Participatory Politics and the Pursuit of Democratic Engagement.” Theory & Research in Social Education 44 (1): 135. https://doi.org/10.1080/00933104.2015.1132646.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Keller, Jessalynn Marie. 2016. Girls’ Feminist Blogging in a Postfeminist Age. New York: Routledge.

  • Keller, Jessalyn. 2019. “‘Oh, She's a Tumblr Feminist:’ Exploring the Platform Vernacular of Girls’ Social Media Feminisms.” Social Media + Society (3): 111. https://doi.org/10.1177/2056305119867442.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Krisjanous, Jayne. 2016. “An Exploratory Multimodal Discourse Analysis of Dark Tourism Websites: Communicating Issues Around Contested Sites.” Journal of Destination Marketing and Management 5: 341350.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • MacLure, Maggie. 2013. “The Wonder of Data,” Cultural Studies – Critical Methodologies 13 (4): 228232.

  • McRobbie, Angela. 2007. “Top Girls? Young Women and the Post-feminist Sexual Contract,” Cultural Studies 21 (4/5): 718737. https://doi.org/10.1080/09502380701279044.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Mendes, Kaitlynn, Jessica Ringrose, and Jessalynn Keller. 2019. Digital Feminist Activism: Girls and Women Fight Back Against Rape Culture. New York: Oxford University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Pauwels, Luc. 2012. “A Multimodal Framework for Analyzing Websites as Cultural Expressions.” Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 17: 247265.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Raby, Rebecca, Caroline Caron, Sophie Théwissen-LeBlanc, Jessica Prioletta, and Claudia Mitchell. 2018. “Vlogging on YouTube: The Online, Political Engagement of Young Canadians Advocating for Social Change.” Journal of Youth Studies 21 (4): 495512. https://doi.org/10.1080/13676261.2017.1394995.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Renold, EJ. 2018. “‘Feel What I Feel’: Making Da(r)ta With Teen Girls for Creative Activisms on how Sexual Violence Matters.” Journal of Gender Studies 27 (1): 3755. https://doi.org/10.1080/09589236.2017.1296352.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • St. Pierre, Elizabeth Adams. 2000. “Poststructural Feminism in Education: An Overview.” Qualitative Studies in Education 13 (5): 477515.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Taft, Jessica. 2017. “Teenage Girls’ Narratives of Becoming Activists.” Contemporary Social Science 12 (1/2): 2739. https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2017.1324173.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Todd, Zoe. 2016. “An Indigenous Feminist's Take on the Ontological Turn: ‘Ontology’ is Just Another Word for Colonialism.” Journal of Historical Sociology 29 (1): 422.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Tupper, Jennifer. 2014. “Social Media and the Idle No More Movement: Citizenship, Activism and Dissent in Canada.” Journal of Social Science Education 13 (4): 8794. https://doi.org/10.2390/jsse-v13-i4-1354.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1007 612 270
Full Text Views 186 32 11
PDF Downloads 114 40 11