“Defining Ourselves for Ourselves”

Black Girls Conceptualize Black Girlhood Online

in Girlhood Studies
Author:
Cierra Kaler-JonesDance and Art Teacher, USA ckalerjones@gmail.com

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Abstract

Black girls have long created their own subversive and creative forms of curriculum and pedagogy. I explore adolescent Black girls’ suggestions for teaching and learning about Black girlhood online based on a virtual summer arts program called Black Girls S.O.A.R. Through performance ethnography, we contended with our conceptualizations of Black girlhood and identity sense-making. The co-researchers suggested that storytelling, learner-centered pedagogy, and intentional community-building must be central in virtual pedagogy and saw reclaiming girlhood and self-care as two essential topics for teaching Black girlhood content. I also reflect on the tensions and possibilities of co-constructing participatory learning environments with Black girls, particularly as it relates to disrupting power and adultism.

Contributor Notes

Cierra Kaler-Jones (ORCID: 0000-0002-0413-3834) has been teaching dance and art in community spaces for over ten years. Her research interests focus on exploring liberatory and joyful educational spaces while refuting control tactics in schools that deny students opportunities for creativity and critical consciousness-building. Email: ckalerjones@gmail.com

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