Toward Black Girl Futures

Rememorying in Black Girlhood Studies

in Girlhood Studies
Author:
Ashley L. Smith-Purviance Ohio State University, USA smith-purviance.1@osu.edu

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Sara Jackson BA, Providence College, USA sjackso8@friars.providence.edu

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Brianna Harper Graduate Student, Emory University, USA bharper1@friars.providence.edu

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Jennifer Merandisse Undergraduate Student, Providence College, USA jmerandi@friars.providence.edu

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Brittney Smith Undergraduate Student, Providence College, USA bsmith30@friars.providence.edu

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Kim Hussey Undergraduate Student, Providence College, USA khussey@friars.providence.edu

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Eliana Lopez Undergraduate Student, Providence College, USA elopez4@friars.providence.edu

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Abstract

Black Girlhood Studies provide an authentic vantage point for the narratives and experiences of young Black girls today. Black women working alongside Black girls play a central role in the development of the field, yet their narratives and experiences as former Black girls remain decentered. Using autoethnography, we describe the experiences of seven community-engaged Black women scholars, including one professor who teaches Black Girlhood Studies courses and is the co-creator of a virtual space for middle school Black girls called Black Girl Magic (BGM), and six undergraduate students who are enrolled in the course and/or serve as BGM co-facilitators. We discuss how teaching, learning, and practicing Black Girlhood Studies shapes a collective rememorying process for Black women seeking to make their girlhood experiences legible.

Contributor Notes

Ashley Smith-Purviance (ORCID: 0000-0002-7811-1187) is an assistant professor at The Ohio State University in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and African American and African Studies. Email: smith-purviance.1@osu.edu

Student authors attend(ed) Providence College.

Sara Jackson majored in English and Women's and Gender studies and minored in Public and Community Service. Email: sjackso8@friars.providence.edu

Brianna Harper is currently a public health graduate student at Emory University. Email: bharper1@friars.providence.edu

Jennifer Merandisse is a junior Psychology major. Email: jmerandi@friars.providence.edu

Brittney Smith is a senior Marketing major and Black Studies minor. Email: bsmith30@friars.providence.edu

Kim Hussey is a junior accounting major. Email: khussey@friars.providence.edu

Eliana Lopez majored in Creative Writing. Email: elopez4@friars.providence.edu

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Girlhood Studies

An Interdisciplinary Journal

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