Toward Black Girl Futures

Rememorying in Black Girlhood Studies

in Girlhood Studies
Author:
Ashley L. Smith-PurvianceOhio State University, USA smith-purviance.1@osu.edu

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https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7811-1187
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Sara JacksonBA, Providence College, USA sjackso8@friars.providence.edu

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Brianna HarperGraduate Student, Emory University, USA bharper1@friars.providence.edu

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Jennifer MerandisseUndergraduate Student, Providence College, USA jmerandi@friars.providence.edu

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Brittney SmithUndergraduate Student, Providence College, USA bsmith30@friars.providence.edu

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Kim HusseyUndergraduate Student, Providence College, USA khussey@friars.providence.edu

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Eliana LopezUndergraduate Student, Providence College, USA elopez4@friars.providence.edu

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Black Girlhood Studies provide an authentic vantage point for the narratives and experiences of young Black girls today. Black women working alongside Black girls play a central role in the development of the field, yet their narratives and experiences as former Black girls remain decentered. Using autoethnography, we describe the experiences of seven community-engaged Black women scholars, including one professor who teaches Black Girlhood Studies courses and is the co-creator of a virtual space for middle school Black girls called Black Girl Magic (BGM), and six undergraduate students who are enrolled in the course and/or serve as BGM co-facilitators. We discuss how teaching, learning, and practicing Black Girlhood Studies shapes a collective rememorying process for Black women seeking to make their girlhood experiences legible.

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