Trauma, Time, and the ‘Singular Plural’

The Israeli Television Series Fauda

in Israel Studies Review
View More View Less
  • 1 The Open University of Israel Nurit.gertz@gmail.com
  • 2 Tel Aviv University razyosef@post.tau.ac.il
Restricted access

abstract

The Israeli television series Fauda tells the story of an undercover unit pursuing a notorious terrorist to avenge terror attacks that he masterminded and to prevent his future attacks. The series bolsters Israeli collectivity by re-enacting past traumas and capitalizing on the fear of traumas yet to come, but it also dismantles national unity by portraying other ways for individuals to develop relationships with the collectives to which they belong and by attempting to find alternative temporalities to ‘traumatic time’ that returns to haunt the present from the future. While the plot aims to reinforce national identity by overcoming situations of imminent disaster, the televisual language creates another time based on overlaps between the various narrative threads of both Israeli and Palestinian identities, thus opening up new opportunities for co-existence and another relationship between the singular and the plural.

Contributor Notes

nurith gertz is Professor Emerita of Film and Literature at The Open University of Israel. She has served as head of theoretical studies in the Department of Film and Television at Tel Aviv University and currently teaches in the Department of Culture, Creation, and Production at Sapir Academic College. She is the author of Myths in Israeli Culture: Captives of a Dream (2000) and co-author with George Khleifi of Palestinian Cinema: Landscape, Trauma and Memory (2008).

raz yosef is an Associate Professor and head of the Steve Tisch School of Film and Television at Tel Aviv University. He is the author of Beyond Flesh: Queer Masculinities and Nationalism in Israeli Cinema (2004) and The Politics of Loss and Trauma in Contemporary Israeli Cinema (2011), and a co-editor of Just Images: Ethics and the Cinematic (2011), Deeper Than Oblivion: Trauma and Memory in Israeli Cinema (2013), and Another Sex: Selected Essays in Israeli Queer and LGBT Studies (2016, in Hebrew).

  • Adler, Yuval, dir. 2013. Bethlehem. [In Hebrew.] Film, 99 min., Pie Films, Israel, Germany, Belgium.

  • Agamben, Giorgio. 1998. Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life. Trans. Daniel Heller-Roazen. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

  • Barabash, Uri,dir. 1984. Beyond the Walls. [In Hebrew.] Film, 103 min., April Films, Israel.

  • Benjamin, Walter. (1940) 2006. “On the Concept of History.” In Selected Writings, Volume 4: 1938–1940, trans. Edmund Jephco et al., ed. Howard Eliand and Michael W. Jennings, 389401. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Berlant, Lauren. 1997. The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

  • Borradori, Giovanna. 2003. Philosophy in a Time of Terror: Dialogues with Jürgen Habermas and Jacques Derrida. Trans. Luis Guzman, Michael Naas, and Pascale-Anne Brault. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bouzaglo, Haim,dir. 1988. Fictitious Marriage. [In Hebrew.] Film, 90 min., Tom Films, Israel.

  • Bukai, Rafi,dir. 1986. Avanti Popolo. [In Hebrew.] Film, 84 min., Kastel Productions, Israel.

  • Dayan, Nissim,dir. 1985. On a Narrow Bridge. [In Hebrew.] Film, 100 min., Tom Films, Israel.

  • Dotan, Shimon,dir. 1986. Smile of the Lamb. [In Hebrew.] Film, 95 min., Dotan/ Aroch Productions, Israel.

  • Edelman, Lee. 2004. No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive. Durham, NC: Duke University.

  • Elsaesser, Thomas. 2012. “European Cinema and the Postheroic Narrative: Jean-Luc Nancy, Claire Denis, and Beau Travail.” New Literary History 43 (4): 703725.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Elsaesser, Thomas. 2014. German Cinema—Terror and Trauma: Cultural Memory since 1945. London: Routledge.

  • Fiske, John. 1986. “Television: Polysemy and Popularity.” Critical Studies in Mass Communication 3 (4): 391408.

  • Foucault, Michel. 1979. Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. Trans. Alan Sheridan. New York: Pantheon Books.

  • Gertz, Nurith. 1993. Motion Fiction: Israeli Fiction in Film. [In Hebrew.] Tel Aviv: Open University of Israel Publishing House.

  • Harlap, Itay. 2013. “Serial Trauma: Seriality and Post-Trauma in the Israeli Television Drama Parashat Ha-Shavu’a.” Jewish Film and New Media: An International Journal 1 (2): 166189.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Heller, Or, dir. 2015. Mist’aravim: On Life and Death. [In Hebrew.] Television documentary, 42 min., Channel 10, Israel.

  • Herzog, Yitzhak. 2016. “IDF Soldiers Are the Children of Us All.” [In Hebrew.] Facebook post, 29 June. https://www.facebook.com/IsaacHerzog/posts/1138265129549783:0 (accessed 5 July 2017).

    • Export Citation
  • Issacharoff, Avi, and Lior Raz, dirs. 2015. Fauda. [In Hebrew.] Television series, season 1, Yes television, Israel.

  • Leibovich, Nitzan. 2010. “The Return of German Philosophy: Bio-Political Cinema and Defensive Democracy.” [In Hebrew.] Theory and Criticism 36: 1133.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lis, Yonatan. 2016. “Smotrich: ‘My Wife Shouldn’t Have to Lie in a Bed Alongside Someone Who Might Be Giving Birth to Someone Who’s Going to Murder My Child Twenty Years from Now.’” [In Hebrew.] Ha’aretz, 5 April. http://www.haaretz.co.il/news/politi/1.2905630.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Munk, Yael. 2016. “FaudaStrangers to Ourselves: The Israeli Occupation on Prime Time, or Ways to Rethink the Enemy.” [In Hebrew.] Paper presented at the Eleventh Tel Aviv International Colloquium on Cinema and Television Studies, Tel Aviv University, 79 June.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Nancy, Jean-Luc. 2000. Being Singular Plural. Trans. Robert D. Richardson and Anne E. O’Byrne. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ophir, Adi. 2003. “Between the Sanctity of Life and Its Abandonment: Introduction to Homo Sacer.” [In Hebrew.] In The Technology of Justice: Law, Science, and Society, ed. Shai Lavie, 395434. Tel Aviv: Ramot Publications, Tel Aviv University.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ron, Baruch. 2016. “Youth 2016: The Full Survey.” [In Hebrew.] Israel Today, 15 April. http://www.israelhayom.co.il/article/373577.

  • Schwarzmantel, John. 2007. “Community as Communication: Jean-Luc Nancy and ‘Being-in-Common.’Political Studies 55 (2): 459476.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Shenhav, Yehuda. 2006. “The Casualties of Sovereignty: The Exception and the State of Emergency—Where Did Empirical History Go?” [In Hebrew.] Theory and Criticism 29: 205218.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Shenhav, Yehuda,Christof Schmidt, and Shimon Zenlinker, eds. 2009. Ex Gratia: The Exception and States of Emergency. [In Hebrew.] Jerusalem: Van Leer Institute and Ha-kibbutz Ha-me’ukhad Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Shohat, Ella. 1989. Israeli Cinema: East/West and the Politics of Representation. Austin: University of Texas Press.

  • Wachsmann, Daniel,dir. 1982. Hamsin. [In Hebrew.] Film, 88 min., Hamsin Film Production, Israel.

  • Watkin, Christopher. 2007. “A Different Alterity: Jean-Luc Nancy’s ‘Singular Plural.’Paragraph 30 (2): 5064.

  • Zanger, Anat. 2012. “Just Look at Yourselves: The Face and the Ethical Event in Israeli Cinema.” Studies in Documentary Film 6 (3): 291306.

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 88 88 24
Full Text Views 34 34 2
PDF Downloads 15 15 2