Making Friends of the Nations

Australian Interwar Magazines and Middlebrow Orientalism in the Pacific

in Journeys
View More View Less
  • 1 James Cook University victoria.kuttainen@jcu.edu.au
  • 2 James Cook University sarah.galletly@jcu.edu.au
Restricted access

Abstract

As travel began to massify in the aftermath of the Great War when passenger ships still regularly stopped at ports of call, and as Australia developed a sub-imperial relationship to its near Melanesian neighbors in Papua and New Guinea, the Pacific and its islands loomed large in Australians’ consciousness and print culture. This article employs Christina Klein’s concept of “middlebrow orientalism” to examine how Australia’s quality magazines, MAN and The BP Magazine, reflected an “expansive material and symbolic investment in Asia and the Pacific” (2003: 11) between the two world wars. While development of a consumerist, leisure relationship with the region is in evidence in these magazines that undoubtedly assume the superiority of White Australia, we argue they also promote diversity, inclusiveness, and an emerging maturity in outlook that conveyed the way in which Australians began to understand themselves as Pacific citizens wishing to “make friends of the nations.”

Journeys

The International Journal of Travel and Travel Writing

  • Bennett, Bruce, ed. 1981. Cross Currents: Magazines and Newspapers in Australian Literature. Melbourne: Longman Cheshire.

  • Carter, David. 2007. “After Postcolonialism.” Meanjin 66 (2): 114119.

  • Carter, David. 2013a. Always Almost Modern: Australian Print Cultures and Modernity. North Melbourne: Australian Scholarly.

  • Carter, David. 2013b. “Antipodean Romance, Crime and Sensation: Australian Popular Fiction in British and American Markets 1890–1925.” Pp. 86100 in Scenes of Reading: Is Australian Literature a World Literature? ed. Robert Dixon and Brigid Rooney. North Melbourne: Australian Scholarly.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cawelti, John G. 1976. Adventure, Mystery, and Romance: Formula Stories as Art and Popular Culture. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Dixon, Robert. 1995. Writing the Colonial Adventure: Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875–1914. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Dixon Robert. 1996. “Playing Tarzan; Australian Photography and Travel Writing about Melanesia, 1920–1945.” Australian Journal of Art 13 (1): 133142.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Dixon, Robert. 2001. Prosthetic Gods: Travel, Representation and Colonial Governance. St. Lucia: University of Queensland Press.

  • Dixon, Robert. 2002. “Frank Hurley’s Pearls and Savages: Travel, Representation, and Colonial Governance.” Pp. 191218 in In Transit: Travel, Text, Empire, ed. Helen Gilbert and Anna Johnston. New York: Peter Lang.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Dixon, Chris, and Prue Ahrens. 2010. “Traversing the Pacific: Modernity on the Move from Coast to Coast.” Pp. 17 in Coast to Coast: Case Histories of Modern Pacific Crossings, ed. Prue Ahrens and Chris Dixon. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Dixon, Robert, and Veronica Kelly, eds. 2008. The Impact of the Modern: Vernacular Modernities in Australia 1870s–1960s. Sydney: Sydney University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Douglas, Ngaire. 1996. They Came For Savages: 100 Years of Tourism in Melanesia. Lismore: Southern Cross University Press.

  • Gelder, Ken, 2004. Popular Fiction: The Logics and Practices of a Literary Field. London and New York: Routledge.

  • Gelder, Ken, 2011. “Negotiating the Colonial Australian Popular Fiction Archive.” JASAL 11 (1) (Special Issue: Archive Madness).

  • Gibson, Ross. 1993. “‘I Could Not See as Much as I Desired.’” Pp. 2239 in Pirating the Pacific: Images of Travel, Trade & Tourism, ed. Ann Stephen. Haymarket, NSW: Powerhouse.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Greenop, Frank S. 1947. History of Magazine Publishing in Australia. Sydney: K.G. Murray.

  • Hammill, Faye, and Michelle Smith. 2015. Magazines, Travel and Middlebrow Culture: Canadian Periodicals in English and French, 1925–1960. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Klein, Christina. 2003. Cold War Orientalism: Asia in the Middlebrow Imagination, 1945–1961. Berkeley: University of California Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kuttainen, Victoria. 2013. “Style, Modernity and Popular Magazines: Writing Pacific Travel.” Pp. 5156 in Telling Stories: Australian Life and Literature, 1935–2012, ed. Tanya Dalziell and Paul Genoni Clayton. Victoria: Monash University Publishing.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kuttainen, Victoria. 2014. “Trafficking Literature: Travel, Modernity, and the Middle Ground of Canadian and Australian Middlebrow Print Cultures.” International Journal of Canadian Studies 48 (1): 85103.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kuttainen, Victoria, Susann Liebich, and Sarah Galletly. 2015. “Place, Platform, and Value: Periodicals and the Pacific in Late Colonial Modernity.” English Studies in Canada 40 (1): 155177.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lutz, Catherine A., and Jane L. Collins. 1993. Reading National Geographic. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.

  • Matthews, Jill Julius. 2005. Dance Hall and Picture Palace: Sydney’s Romance with Modernity. Sydney: Currency Press.

  • McCann, Andrew. 2004. Marcus Clarke’s Bohemia: Literature and Modernity in Colonial Melbourne. Melbourne: Melbourne University Press.

  • Ohmann, Richard. 1996. Selling Culture: Magazines, Markets and Class at the Turn of the Century. London: Verso.

  • Pesman, Ros. 1996. Duty Free: Australian Women Abroad. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

  • Radway, Janice A. 1987. Reading the Romance: Women, Patriarchy, and Popular Literature. 1984. London: Verso.

  • Radway, Janice A. 1997. A Feeling for Books: The Book-of-the-Month Club and Middle-Class Desire. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Rolls, Mitchell. 2010. “Reading Walkabout in the 1930s.” Australian Studies 2: 116.

  • Quanchi, Max, 2003. “Contrary Images: Photographing the New Pacific in Walkabout Magazine.” Journal of Australian Studies 27 (79): 7792.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Vickers, Adrian. 1990. “Kipling Goes South: Australian Novels and South East Asia, 1895–1945.” Australian Cultural History 9: 6579.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Walker, David. 1999. Anxious Nation: Australia and the Rise of Asia, 1850–1939. St Lucia: University of Queensland Press.

  • White, Richard. 1979. “The Importance of Being Man.” Pp. 145168 in Australian Popular Culture, ed. Peter Spearritt and David Walker. Sydney: George Allen & Unwin.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • White, Richard. 1987. “Overseas.” Pp. 435445 in Australia 1938, ed. Bill Gammage and Peter Spearritt. Sydney: Fairfax, Syme and Weldon.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • White, Richard (with Sarah-Jane Ballard, Ingrid Brown, Meredith Lake, Patricia Leehy, Lila Oldmeadow). 2005. On Holidays: A History of Getting Away in Australia. Melbourne: Pluto Press Australia.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Woollacott, Angela. 2001. To Try Her Fortune in London: Australian Women, Colonialism, and Modernity. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 192 192 59
Full Text Views 120 120 0
PDF Downloads 2 2 0