A tale of two courses: challenging Millennials to experience culture through film

in Learning and Teaching
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  • 1 University of Massachusetts Amherst kvkirako@anthro.umass.edu
  • | 2 University of Massachusetts Amherst vmclauri@anthro.umass.edu
  • | 3 University of Massachusetts Amherst cspeck@anthro.umass.edu
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Abstract

In this article, we discuss how adding a final film project to a revised ‘Culture through Film’ course led to deeper student learning and higher rates of student success, as well as increased student satisfaction. Ultimately, we urge social science educators to include experiential projects in their courses that connect to all learning styles. Such projects should also challenge students to ‘create’, a task that requires generating ideas, planning and ultimately producing something, which, according to Bloom’s revised taxonomy, engages students in the highest cognitive process (). Although this class focused on the intersections of culture and film and was taught at an American university, we believe these lessons apply more broadly.

Contributor Notes

Katie Kirakosian received her PhD in Anthropology from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2014, where she is currently an Adjunct Lecturer. E-mail: kvkirako@anthro.umass.edu

Virginia McLaurin earned a Master’s Degree in Anthropology and a Graduate Certificate in Native American Indian Studies from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2012 and is currently pursuing her PhD in the Anthropology Department. She was also a Teaching Assistant in the 2015 version of Culture through Film. E-mail: vmclauri@anthro.umass.edu

Cary Speck is currently pursuing a PhD in the Anthropology Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He was also a Teaching Assistant in the 2014 version of Culture through Film. E-mail: cspeck@anthro.umass.edu

Learning and Teaching

The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences

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