Assembling Local Cyclone Knowledge in the Australian Tropics

in Nature and Culture
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  • 1 University College London hannahkjswee@gmail.com
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Abstract

In Far North Queensland, a region in the northeast of Australia, cyclones are an annual risk. As a result of this frequency of cyclonic activity, different forms of cyclone knowledge exist ranging from disaster management information to local conceptualizations. For the people that inhabit this region, cyclones are a lived reality that are known in different, seemingly contradictory ways. Drawing on fifteen months of ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Far North Queensland from 2012 to 2015, this article explores how local cyclone knowledge is assembled from a variety of heterogeneous factors that change and fluctuate through time, and are subject to an ongoing process of evaluation.

Contributor Notes

Hannah Swee has a PhD in social anthropology from University College London where she was an AXA Research Fund Doctoral Fellow in Environmental Risk. Her research focuses on how people live with recurring disaster threats, and her interests include disaster risk reduction, environmental risk, climate change, and sustainability. She currently works on applying academic research in humanitarian organizations. Address: University College London, Department of Anthropology, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom. E-mail: hannahkjswee@gmail.com

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