Neglected Tropical Diseases

Creating a New Disease Grouping

in Nature and Culture
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  • 1 University of Oxford samantha.vanderslott@paediatrics.ox.ac.uk
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Abstract

Neglected tropical diseases show how a disease group can be formed to compete in the global health policy marketplace. The naming and branding of a new disease category is used to organize activities, direct attention and resources, and rationalize the governance of diseases. The politics of classification involves processes of negotiation and conceptual development by key actors. Here, discussions about central characteristics, naming, and inclusion and exclusion criteria are rarely settled. Contradictions are present in the “tropical” and “neglected” characterizations, as well as choices of universalist rather than particularist approaches. Interacting with these considerations is a continued progression in means of dealing with disease from health actors and changing attributes of diseases in populations.

Contributor Notes

Samantha Vanderslott is Postdoctoral Researcher at the Oxford Martin School and Oxford Vaccine Group at the University of Oxford working on topics at the intersection of health, society, and policy. She draws on perspectives from sociology, history, and science and technology studies. She completed her PhD at the Department of Science and Technology Studies at University College London. Before that, she worked as a senior policy adviser in the UK Civil Service. She holds an MSc in Global Governance and Diplomacy from the University of Oxford and a BSc first-class honors in Economics and International Development from the University of Bath. Email: samantha.vanderslott@paediatrics.ox.ac.uk

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