Humans “in the Loop”?

Human-Centrism, Posthumanism, and AI

in Nature and Culture
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  • 1 Western University, Canada mohuya@protonmail.com
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Abstract

More and more scholarly attention is being paid to the challenges of governing artificial intelligence and emergent technologies. Most of the focus remains on questions of how to preserve the human-centeredness of increasingly advancing machine-driven technologies. I problematize discourses of “human-centered AI” that prioritize human control over nonhuman intelligences as a solution for the challenges posed by emergent technologies like artificial intelligence. Posthumanism provides a compelling theoretical basis for this line of questioning and for reimagining alternative ethical constructs. I outline and consider three distinct scenarios in which (a) humans are at the center of command and control, (b) humans and nonhumans share control, (c) human oversight is completely removed. I suggest that more attention could be given to critical and speculative ways of reimagining the concepts of “human,” “nonhuman,” and human/nonhuman relations.

Contributor Notes

Nandita Biswas Mellamphy is Associate Professor of Political Science, Affiliate member in Women's Studies and Feminist Research, core faculty in the Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism, and current Director of The Electro-Governance research group at Western University in Canada. Her research puts Critical Social and Political Thought in dialogue with Continental Philosophy, Science and Technology Studies, and Media/Information Studies. She is (co)author and (co)editor of several works including The Three Stigmata of Friedrich Nietzsche (2011) and The Digital Dionysus: Nietzsche and the Network-centric Condition (2016). She serves as Assistant Editor of Canadian Journal of Political Science, as well Associate Editor of Interconnections: Journal of Posthumanism. ORCID: 0000-0002-3576-1841. E-mail: mohuya@protonmail.com

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