Instances of Cinema

in Projections
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  • 1 University of Queensland t.nannicelli@uq.edu.au
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Abstract

This article sketches a commonplace yet neglected epistemic puzzle raised by the diversity of our film-viewing practices. Because our appreciative practices allow for variability in the “instances” of cinematic works we engage, many of our experiential encounters with those works are flawed or impoverished in a number of ways. The article outlines a number of ways in which instances of cinema can vary—including, for example, in terms of color, score, and aspect ratio. This variability of instances of cinema and, hence, the variability in our experiences of a cinematic work raise potential problems around normative questions of interpretation and evaluation.

Contributor Notes

Ted Nannicelli lectures in Film and Television Studies at the University of Queensland. He is the author of A Philosophy of the Screenplay (Routledge, 2013) and Appreciating the Art of Television: A Philosophical Perspective (Routledge, 2016), as well as coeditor, with Paul Taberham, of Cognitive Media Theory (Routledge, 2014).

Projections

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