Twofoldness in Moving Images

The Philosophy and Neuroscience of Filmic Experience

in Projections
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  • 1 Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany joerg.fingerhut@hu-berlin.de
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Abstract

When watching a film, we are seeing-in moving images. Film's visual experience is therefore twofold, encompassing a recognitional (the scene presented, the story told, etc.) and a configurational fold (editing, camera movement, etc.). Although some researchers endorse twofoldness with respect to film, there is also significant resistance and misrepresentations of its very nature. This paper argues that the concept is central to an understanding of the basic apprehension and the aesthetic appreciation of film. It demonstrates how twofoldness could play a more substantial role in a new cognitive film theory and a naturalized aesthetics of film. By discussing recent theories of our motor engagement with cinema it shows how referencing to the interplay of two filmic folds could inform such a theory.

Contributor Notes

Joerg Fingerhut is Senior Postdoctoral Researcher at the Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. He holds a PhD in philosophy and works experimentally and theoretically in the field of 4E (embodied, embedded, extended, enactive) cognition and aesthetics. Email: joerg.fingerhut@hu-berlin.de

Projections

The Journal for Movies and Mind

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