Book Reviews

in Projections
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  • 1 Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, and Professor of Radiology, Washington University in Saint Louis jzacks@wustl.edu
  • | 2 McGill University, Canada trevor.ponech@mcgill.ca
  • | 3 Honorary Appointment, Film and Media Studies, University of Queensland, Australia
  • | 4 Professor, Department of the History of Art and Architecture and Director, Film and Media Studies Program, Tufts University, USA
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Gallese, Vittorio, and Michele Guerra. The Empathic Screen: Cinema and Neuroscience. Trans. Frances Anderson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019, 272 pp., $45.00, ISBN: 9780198793533.

Rawls, Christina, Diana Neiva, and Steven S. Gouveia, eds. Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides. New York: Routledge, 2019, 389 pp., $160 (hardback), ISBN: 978-1-138-35169-1.

Moss-Wellington, Wyatt. Narrative Humanism: Kindness and Complexity in Fiction and Film. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2019, 256 pp., $29.95 (paperback), ISBN: 9781474454322.

Perez, Gilberto. The Eloquent Screen. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2019, 448 pp., $29.95, ISBN: 978-0-8166-4133-8.

Contributor Notes

Jeffrey M. Zacks is Professor and Associate Chair of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, and Professor of Radiology, Washington University in Saint Louis. He studies perception, navigation, and memory in the mind and brain, and has written about the cognitive neuroscience of film for both scientific and general audiences, including Flicker: Your Brain on Movies (Oxford, 2014). E-mail: jzacks@wustl.edu

Trevor Ponech is Associate Professor of English at McGill University. E-mail: trevor.ponech@mcgill.ca

Jane Stadler holds an Honorary appointment in Film and Media Studies at The University of Queensland, Australia. She is author of Pulling Focus: Intersubjective Experience, Narrative Film and Ethics (2008) and co-author of Screen Media (2009), Imagined Landscapes (2016), and Media and Society (2016). E-mail: j.stadler@uq.edu.au

Malcolm Turvey is Sol Gittleman Professor in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture and Director of the Film & Media Studies Program at Tufts University. His most recent book is Play Time: Jacques Tati and Comedic Modernism (Columbia University Press, 2019).

Projections

The Journal for Movies and Mind

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  • Bezdek, Matthew A., Richard J. Gerrig, William G. Wenzel, Jaemin Shin, Kate Pirog Revill, and Eric H. Schumacher. 2015. Neural evidence that suspense narrows attentional focus. Neuroscience 303: 33845. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.06.055

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  • Blake, Randolph, Robert Sekuler, and Emily Grossman. 2004. “Motion processing in human visual cortex.” In The primate visual system, ed. J. H. Kaas and Christine E Collins, 31144. CRC Press.

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  • Bordwell, David. 1989. “A case for cognitivism.” Iris 9: 1140.

  • Dinstein, Ilan, Cibu Thomas, Marlene Behrmann, and David J. Heeger, 2008. “A mirror up to nature.” Current Biology 18 (1): R13R18.

  • Hasson, Uri, Ohad Landesman, Barbara Knappmeyer, Ignacio Vallines, Nava Rubin, and David Heeger, 2008. “Neurocinematics: The neuroscience of film.” Projections 2 (1): 126.

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  • Heimann, Katrin S., Sebo Uithol, Marta Calbi, Maria A. Umiltà , Michele Guerra , and Gallese, Vittorio. 2017. “Cuts in action”: A high-density EEG study investigating the neural correlates of different editing techniques in film. Cognitive Science 41 (6): 15551588.

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  • Heimann, Katrin S., Umiltà, Maria Alessandra, Guerra, Michele, and Vittorio Gallese. 2014. “Moving mirrors: A high-density eeg study investigating the effect of camera movements on motor cortex activation during action observation.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 26: 115. https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_00602

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  • Hickok, Gregory. 2009. “Eight problems for the mirror neuron theory of action understanding in monkeys and humans.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 21 (7): 12291243. https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn.2009.21189

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  • Rizzolatti, Giacomo, Leonardo Fogassi, and Vittorio Gallese. 2001. “Neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the understanding and imitation of action.” Nature Reviews Neuroscience 2 (9): 66170.

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  • Shimamura, Arthur P., ed. 2013. Psychocinematics: Exploring cognition at the movies. Oxford Univ. Press.

  • Sitnikova, Tatiana, Phillip J. Holcomb, Kristi A. Kiyonaga, and Gina R. Kuperberg. 2008. “Two neurocognitive mechanisms of semantic integration during the comprehension of visual real-world events.” The Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 20 (11): 203757.

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  • Carroll, Noël, Laura T. Di Summa, and Shawn Loht, eds. 2019. The Palgrave Handbook of the Philosophy of Film and Motion Pictures. Sham: Palgrave Macmillan.

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  • Herzogenrath, Bernd, ed. 2017. Film as Philosophy. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

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  • Bookchin, Murray. 1995. Re-Enchanting Humanity: A Defense of the Human Spirit Against Anti-Humanism, Misanthropy, Mysticism and Primitivism. London: Cassell.

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  • Coplan, Amy. 2006. “Catching Characters’ Emotions: Emotional Contagion Responses to Narrative Fiction Film.” Film Studies 8 (1): 2638.

  • D'Olimpio, Laura. 2018. Media and Moral Education: A Philosophy of Critical Engagement. New York: Routledge.

  • Plantinga, Carl. 2018. Screen Stories: Emotion and the Ethics of Engagement. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  • Prinz, Jesse. 2011. “Is Empathy Necessary for Morality?” In Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives, ed. Peter Goldie and Amy Coplan, 211229. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

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  • Said, Edward. 2004. Humanism and Democratic Criticism. New York: Columbia University Press.

  • Stenner, Karen, and Jonathan Haidt. 2018. “Authoritarianism Is Not a Momentary Madness.” In Can It Happen Here? Authoritarianism in America, ed. Cass Sunstein, 174195. New York: Harper Collins.

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  • Aristotle. 2005. Poetics and Rhetoric. New York: Barnes and Noble.

  • Bordwell, David. 2008. Poetics of Cinema. New York: Routledge.

  • Lakoff, George, and Mark Johnson. 1980. Metaphors We Live By. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

  • Michelson, Annette, ed. 1984. Kino-Eye: The Writings of Dziga Vertov. Berkeley: University of California Press.

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