Rethinking “new regionalisms” out of Africa 2020

in Regions and Cohesion
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  • 1 UMass Boston, USA timothy.shaw@umb.edu
  • 2 Frederick S. Pardee Center for International Futures, Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver, USA abigail.kabandula@du.edu
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Abstract

This article suggests that the quarter of the world's states that are African can yet contribute to new “developmental” regionalisms in theory and practice, as the North enters a period of ambivalence about, if not retreat from, positive global engagement. This article builds on the pioneering analysis of Björn Hettne with Inotai on new regionalism and the related contributions out of contemporary “development” studies by Jan Nederveen Pieterse on East-South relations and Oliver Stuenkel on a non-Western world.

Resumen

Este artículo sugiere que la cuarta parte de los Estados del mundo que son africanos pueden todavía contribuir a nuevos regionalismos “desarrollistas” (DR) en la teoría y en la práctica, a medida que el Norte entra en un período de ambivalencia sobre, si no de retractación de, su compromiso global positivo. Este artículo se basa en el análisis pionero de Björn Hettne con Inotai sobre el nuevo regionalismo y las contribuciones conexas de los estudios contemporáneos sobre “desarrollo” de Jan Nederveen Pieterse sobre las relaciones Este–Sur y Oliver Stuenkel sobre un mundo no occidental.

Résumé

Cet article suggère que le quart des États du monde qui sont africains peuvent encore contribuer à de nouveaux régionalismes “développementaux” (DR) en théorie et en pratique, alors que le Nord entre dans une période d'ambivalence, voire de retrait, quant à son engagement mondial. Cet essai s'appuie sur l'analyse pionnière de Hettne et Inotai (1994) concernant le nouveau régionalisme et sur les contributions connexes des études contemporaines relatives au “développement” de Pieterse (2011) et les relations Est-Sud et de Stuenkel (2015 & 2016) pour le monde non occidental.

Contributor Notes

TIMOTHY M. SHAW has spent the last two decades animating graduate programs in Denmark (Aalborg), London (Commonwealth Studies), University of the West Indies in T&T (IIR), and now PhD in Global Governance and Human Security at UMass Boston; he is an associate research fellow at UNU-CRIS in Bruges. E-mail: timothy.shaw@umb.edu

ABIGAIL KABANDULA is the Director of the Africa Program and a research scientist at the Frederick S. Pardee Center for International Futures at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver. ORCID: 0000-0002-8037-0276. E-mail: Abigail.Kabandula@du.edu

Regions and Cohesion

Regiones y Cohesión / Régions et Cohésion

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