Regions, borders, and social policy

The limits of welfare in regional cohesion debates

in Regions and Cohesion
View More View Less
  • 1 Université du Luxembourg, Luxembourg reco@berghahnjournals.com
  • 2 RISC Consortium reco@berghahnjournals.com

This first issue of Volume Four of Regions & Cohesion continues a trend of articles that gained momentum in Volume Three, focusing on the territorial aspects of welfare in social cohesion debates. The Summer 2013 issue of the journal presented a collection of articles that specifically discussed the role of borders and border policies in social cohesion politics. Although this collection was not intended to be presented as a thematically specific issue, the simultaneous arrival of these pieces highlighted the importance of borders in defining the territorial limits of cohesion and the ensuing renegotiation of these limits in political debates. For example, the article by Irina S. Burlacu and Cathal O’Donoghue focused on the impacts of the European Union’s social security coordination policy on the welfare of cross-border workers in Belgium and Luxembourg. The article illustrated the limits of this regional policy as cross-border workers do not receive equal treatment compared to domestic workers in the country of employment. Similarly, an article by Franz Clément in the same issue analyzed the “socio-political representation” of cross-border workers and discusses how such workers can mobilize for socioeconomic rights in institutions aimed at worker protection (such as professional associations, trade unions, etc.). Both articles show that despite formal regionalization of legislation concerning social rights and representation, national boundaries clearly present challenges to cross-border workers who have difficulty negotiating rights in both their country of employment and country of residence.

If the inline PDF is not rendering correctly, you can download the PDF file here.

Regions and Cohesion

Regiones y Cohesión / Régions et Cohésion

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 28 28 2
PDF Downloads 16 16 4