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Japan’s internal cohesion and external conflict with neighbors

in Regions and Cohesion
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  • 1 State University of New York (SUNY), College at Oneontam USA Robert.Compton@oneonta.edu
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Contributor Notes

ROBERT W. COMPTON, JR. is Professor of Africana and Latino Studies and Political Science at the State University of New York (SUNY), College at Oneonta. His research focuses on the intersection of political development and political economy in Southern Africa and East Asia. A 2008 US Fulbright Scholar to the University of Zimbabwe, Compton worked with the Center for International Development’s democracy and governance projects in Zimbabwe and Uganda. He is an editor of and contributor to Home, community and identity (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017 forthcoming), Imagining globalization (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2009) and Transforming East Asian domestic and international politics (Ashgate 2002), and author of East Asian democratization (Praeger, 2000). Compton’s articles, review essays, and book reviews have appeared previously in Regions & Cohesion; Journal of African Policy Studies; Perspectives on Politics; The International Journal on World Peace; Africa Today; and Praxis: Gender and Cultural Critique.

Regions and Cohesion

Regiones y Cohesión / Régions et Cohésion

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