Human rights-based service delivery

Assessing the role of national human rights institutions in democracy and development in Ghana and Uganda

in Regions and Cohesion
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Richard Iroanya North West University, South Africa obinnarichard@yahoo.com

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Patrick Dzimiri University of Venda, South Africa pdzimiri@gmail.com

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Edith Phaswana University of South Africa phaswed@unisa.ac.za

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Abstract

This article examines the extent to which National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) in Ghana and Uganda contribute to the strengthening of democracy and sustainable development in those countries. A human rights-based approach is used to investigate human rights violations, marginalization, exclusions, and discrimination against vulnerable groups in society. This article examines whether NHRIs are proactive in adopting preventive measures to protect and promote human rights within the African context. The study utilized a qualitative methodology and a case study design. It found that the legal environment on which NHRIs are located and their operations largely determine their effectiveness, as well as whether good governance and sustainable development are achievable.

Contributor Notes

RICHARD IROANYA is a research fellow in the Department of Political Studies and International Relations, North West University, Vaal Triangle Campus. E-mail: obinnarichard@yahoo.com

PATRICK DZIMIRI is a senior lecturer in the Department of Development Studies, School of Human and Social Sciences, University of Venda. E-mail: pdzimiri@gmailcom

EDITH D. PHASWANA is a senior lecturer at Thabo Mbeki African Leadership Institute, University of South Africa.E-mail: phaswed@unisa.ac.za

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