Liminality and the Problem of Being-in-the-world: Reflections on Sartre and Merleau-Ponty

in Sartre Studies International
Author: Mark Meyers
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Despite their common roots in the phenomenological tradition, Jean- Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty differed markedly in the way they formulated the problem of being-in-the-world. As is well-known, Sartre’s Being and Nothingness (1943) emphasized the dualistic, oppositional, and even antagonistic relationship between human consciousness and the world inhabited by consciousness, while Merleau-Ponty, in texts such as Phenomenology of Perception (1945) and The Visible and the Invisible (1964, posthumous), conceptualised a kind of originary communion between consciousness and world that stressed their imbrication rather than their separateness.

Sartre Studies International

An Interdisciplinary Journal of Existentialism and Contemporary Culture

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