Origin Stories, Surveillance, and Digital Alter Egos

in Screen Bodies
Author:
Sarah Young Erasmus University, Netherlands young@eshcc.eur.nl

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Abstract

The origin story is an important element for any superhero/villain, as it provides context for a character's seemingly out-of-this-world abilities. A radioactive spider bit Spiderman, and the Penguin was bullied in his youth. It can also be beneficial for surveillance scholars, inasmuch as it provides context for a once invisible but superhuman body of digital information that circulates as a proxy for us in digital milieus. This body is best understood through contemporary surveillance practices, yet metaphors of the panopticon and George Orwell's 1984 proliferate in the surveillant imagination. I argue here that mapping an origin story onto a view of our data as a superhuman body not only creates a tangible representation of surveillance, but it also emphasizes and animates alternative surveillance theories useful for circulation in the surveillant imagination.

Contributor Notes

Sarah Young is a Marie Skłodowska-Curie LEaDing Fellows Postdoc at Erasmus University in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. She researches surveillance, information studies, rhetoric, and technical communication. Email: young@eshcc.eur.nl

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