Avoiding Poison

Congolese Refugees Seeking Cosmological Continuity in Urban Asylum

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  • 1 University of Newcastle, Australia Georgina.Ramsay@newcastle.edu.au
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Abstract

Avoiding poison refers here to practices of securitization that enable refugees from the Democratic Republic of the Congo to exert agency in urban asylum in Uganda. I consider that the stakes of poisoning are not exclusively understood in terms of physiological survival, but are existential, relating to the ways that Congolese refugees imbue purpose in their lives through acts that restore cosmological continuity. Focusing on the cosmological logics through which refugees experience urban asylum, I argue that practices of avoiding poison can be seen as acts of securitization whereby refugees exert agency in precarious contexts of urban asylum.

Contributor Notes

Georgina Ramsay is a Lecturer in the School of Humanities and Social Science at the University of Newcastle, Australia. Her research is conducted in the field of socio-cultural anthropology and focuses on the experiences of refugee women from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi, and Rwanda who have settled in both Australia and Uganda.

Social Analysis

The International Journal of Anthropology

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