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(In)visible Muslim Girls

Sakina Dhalla

There are days I feel invisible, and days I wish I were. As a Brown Shia woman in hijab, I often feel as though people fail to see me, or do not care to. My experiences as a hijabi woman had me feeling simultaneously visible and invisible as those around me tried to decide which version of the Muslim girl I was—the oppressed Muslim girl who needed to be saved, the radical, or for those within my community, the good Muslim girl. The reality is I am none of these. In re/telling my stories, I explore how misrepresentations in the media made me question aspects of my identity and created feelings of (in)visibility, had me striving to be the model minority, and finally, how the hijab became a source of pride and a tool of resistance.

Open access

Inflation as Talk, Economy as Feel

Notes Towards an Anthropology of Inflation

Myriam Amri

Abstract

Whether with central bankers or strolling passers-by, inflation is a recurring term, one that encapsulates contemporary life in Tunisia. How does a concept of economics become everyday talk? Through three stories, I show how what I call ‘inflation-talk’—a mode of small talk that operates as critique and affect—circulates across discursive spaces, ultimately becoming a medium to question economic transformations and reveal political disillusions in post-revolutionary Tunisia. I consider how inflation has become a ‘feel’ of the economy, meaning a measurement not solely for economists but for people to make sense of their everyday. Ultimately, I ask how in times of global inflation, anthropologists, especially ones working in North Africa and West Asia, can theorise a critical anthropology of inflation.

Open access

Inhabiting Volatile Worlds

Franz Krause and Thomas Hylland Eriksen

Abstract

This article proposes volatility as a term with which to approach some of the challenges that shape the current world. We develop this term as an analytical concept and perspective by thinking with people and ecologies from the margins, where uncertainty and rapid transformations have long been the order of the day. An approach focusing on volatility as a social and ecological condition provides an opportunity to consider what life in a radically uncertain world means and does to its inhabitants, which may offer useful lessons to those of us who are currently being forced to let go of their illusionary certainties. The article introduces a special issue elaborating volatility as a concept and perspective in various contexts and from different angles.

Résumé

Cet article propose la volatilité comme un terme permettant d'aborder certains défis qui façonnent le monde actuel. Nous développons ce terme en tant que concept analytique et perspective en réfléchissant avec les populations et les écosystèmes en marge, où l'incertitude et les transformations rapides sont depuis longtemps à l'ordre du jour. Une approche axée sur la volatilité en tant que condition sociale et écologique permet d'examiner ce que signifie de vivre dans un monde radicalement incertain, notamment pour ses habitants - une approche qui peut donner des leçons utiles à ceux d'entre nous qui sont actuellement contraints de se défaire de leurs certitudes illusoires. L'article introduit un numéro spécial qui élabore la volatilité comme concept et perspective dans divers contextes et sous différents angles.

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Internalizing the Present in the Articulation of the Future

Masculinity, Inequality, and Trying On New Possible Selves

Alex Blower and Jon Rainford

Abstract

Young men, especially from working-class backgrounds, often lack the space, capacity, or opportunity to reflect upon masculinities and their role in shaping future trajectories. By devising mechanisms to engage young men differently in creative activities, participants in our project were supported to think beyond assumed futures and explore new possibilities. Mobilizing the theory of possible selves, this article draws on data across three creative university outreach workshops in England with 18 participants who were given the opportunity to explore masculinities using creative writing, photography, and dance/movement. Combining artifact analysis and semi-structured interviews, the article argues that these workshops created safe spaces for young men to articulate their concerns and fears about harm and risk in everyday life while facilitating an exploration of alternative possible selves.

Open access

International water fora and the prevailing needs for local implementation and broader participation

Carmen Maganda Ramírez and Georgina Vidriales-Chan

The United Nations (UN) 2023 Water Conference was held from March 22–24 at the UN Headquarters in New York, USA. There was a clear message from Day 1 of the Conference: “we are not on track to achieving Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6 on water and sanitation for all.” Moreover, business-as-usual approaches for water management do not seem effective facing the so-called triple planetary crisis of climate change, pollution, and biodiversity loss (What is the Triple Planetary Crisis? | UNFCCC). Hence, the Conference aimed to raise awareness of the global water crisis and to make agreements on concerted actions to mobilize all sectors, stakeholders, and countries toward the resolution of this global issue. Among them, the agreement to establish a UN Special Envoy for Water (different figure than the Special Rapporteur on the Human Right to Water), ground more than seven hundred voluntary commitments and pledges, and renew the political momentum in fora such as the High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development, held this July 2023, and the SDG Summit in September 2023 to follow up on the SDGs and Agenda 2030, as well as the commitments of the Decade for Action on Water (2018–2028).The UN, in fact, has promoted numerous initiatives to mobilize citizens around the SDGs. Presently, the UN has declared a total of 206 International Environmental Days to honor specific human and environmental subjects. Among them, only 40 are specifically related to the environment or socio-environmental issues. The majority of all of these declarations are followed by “mega-conferences”1 related to the same subjects: that is, RAMSAR/wetlands sites, sustainable development, biodiversity, climate change, and the latest one is water. The UN states that these commemorative dates and fora are meant to “educate the public on issues of concern, to mobilize political will and resources to address global problems, and to celebrate and reinforce achievements of humanity” (United Nations, 2023) ). We have nothing against the raising of awareness and the need to take political action, but we would rather like to offer a reflection on two critical and historical challenges related to these global events: (a) the implementation of global water fora accords from global-to-local governance, and (b) the need for broader and inclusive participation of different stakeholders, with particular focus on water issues.

Free access

Introduction

Hamlet and the Nordic Countries

Nely Keinänen and Per Sivefors

The story of Shakespeare's Nordic play is also, inevitably, one of cultural exchanges before, during and after the early modern period. From its origins in Nordic tradition to its re-introduction in the Nordic countries through Shakespeare's play, the story of Hamlet from the Middle Ages to the present is inextricably bound up with Nordic history and culture. In tracing some of these links, this special issue develops our recent work on the early dissemination of Shakespeare in the Nordic countries, focusing here on that most Nordic of plays, Hamlet. Although there is already a great deal of criticism on Hamlet in various national or regional contexts, very little of this has focused on the Nordic countries.1 It is therefore fitting, we believe, to provide a necessarily brief outline of the rich and varied history that Shakespeare's play has had in Northern Europe.

Free access

Introduction

Raphael Cohen-Almagor, Joanna Dyduch, and Artur Skorek

This Special Issue is dedicated to the study of public policies in Israel. The issue illustrates the dynamics, specific character, and complexity of policy approaches to diverse issues in Israel. Our aim is to analyze challenges and offer practical remedies. By focusing on public policies, we highlight concepts and strategies of policy management. We also offer recommendations for improving the understanding of some intricate issues and, ipso facto, social conditions in a number of spheres.

Free access

Introduction

Welcome to the party

Cris Shore and Søren S.E. Bengtsen

Belatedly, but with no less enthusiasm or joy, we invite you to celebrate with us the 70th birthday of Professor Susan Wright and her lifelong contribution to, and achievements in, the academic world as an internationally highly acclaimed researcher, scholar and teacher. Beyond her academic achievements, we also wish to celebrate Sue as a unique traveller and interconnector of worlds, cultures, ‘thoughtscapes’ and practices. We wish to celebrate Sue as an anthropologist of ‘the in-between-ness’ of (the) world(s), and her singular and deeply original skill in exploring hidden, unrecognised and unacknowledged connections, interrelations and potential for co-existence and collaborations.

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Introduction

Christiane Lemke and Dominic Nyhuis

For many decades, stability and predictability were the defining features of German party competition. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, West German politics was dominated by the well-known two-and-a-half party system, which later expanded with the rise of the Greens in the 1980s and the addition of the PDS (Party of Democratic Socialism) after German reunification.1 Despite the expanding party system, party competition continued to be anchored by the CDU/CSU (Christian Democratic Union/Christian Social Union) on the center-right and the SPD (Social Democratic Party) on the center-left, such that government coalitions at the federal and state level could typically be formed by two coalition partners, while ideologically coherent coalitions among parties on the left or the right were the norm.

Open access

Inundaciones en la zona baja del río Coyuca

José Vladimir Morales Ruano

Coyuca de Benítez es un municipio costero de la “Costa Grande” del estado mexicano de Guerrero, es catalogado como de muy alto y alto riesgo de inundación por eventos hidrometeorológicos extremos, convirtiéndose en la zona más vulnerable al cambio climático global del estado. La hidrografía del municipio la componen tres subcuencas: A. Cacalutla, R. Coyuca y B. Acapulco, todas son exorreicas y desembocan en La Barra. En el municipio se desarrollan actividades económicas como el cultivo de coco para la producción de copra, cultivo de varios mangos, pesca, acuicultura (tilapia y camarón), comercio y turismo. La mayoría de estas actividades se desarrollan en la llanura costera, la parte baja del municipio. El turismo se concentra en el curso inferior del río Coyuca, a la altura del puente principal municipal, donde hay enramadas (restaurantes) que sirven mariscos a lo largo del río. Otro atractivo turístico es el sector conocido como “La Barra de Coyuca”, un arenal entre el mar y los cuerpos de agua del río Coyuca y las lagunas Mitla y Coyuca. Aquí se puede disfrutar de la playa, la gastronomía local, actividades como observación de aves y paseos en bote por los manglares de las lagunas. Este ecosistema costero brinda beneficios ambientales y socioeconómicos a varios pueblos, pero también representa un riesgo de inundaciones en época de lluvias y huracanes.