Browse

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 21 items for :

  • Gender Studies x
  • Film Studies x
  • Refine by Access: My content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

David William Foster (1940–2020)

Jonathan A. Allan, Chris Haywood, and Frank G. Karioris

Free access

Introduction

Bodies, Sexualities, and Masculinities in the Time of Coronavirus

Jonathan A. Allan, Chris Haywood, and Frank G. Karioris

Free access

Editor's Introduction

Andrew J. Ball

Free access

Introduction

Visibility and Screen Politics after the Transgender Tipping Point

Wibke Straube

Free access

Introduction to the Journal of Bodies, Sexualities, and Masculinities

Jonathan A. Allan, Chris Haywood, and Frank G. Karioris

Free access

Screening Expectation

Brian Bergen-Aurand

Screen Bodies 3.2 engages with a wide variety of topics—fat studies, contemporary queer cinema, (pre)posterity, puzzle films, grief and truth in filmmaking, feminist materialism, digitized bodies, food and horror, and Maghrebi cinema. As well, the selection of articles in this issue represents studies of several media—tv programs, films, publicity stills, and photographs—from a number of locations around the globe—North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. What holds this general issue together, though, is a concern over expectation, assumption, and supposition: what we suppose screens and bodies do and what we suppose they do not do. As usual, with this journal, the focus of this consideration is doublehanded: screen as projection and screen as prohibition. The articles below explore the duality of screens and our responses to them. They engage screening expectation as showing, exposing, divulging, and, at the same time, as testing, partitioning, and withholding. To screen expectation is to reveal and conceal it, and, as these articles argue—each in their own way—this process is what we all engage in when we engage with screening.

Free access

Editorial

Screening Disability

Brian Bergen-Aurand

This issue of Screen Bodies features a Screen Shots section focusing on screening disability, including essays on new disability documentaries, vacillation and the dis/abled male body—especially as it plays out in Fred Zimmerman’s 1950 film The Men—and questions of masquerade and representations of Richard III on stage and screen. It also includes general essays on “undoing” gender through complicity and subversion, the rise in the importance of the haptic in Japanese society, culture, and filmmaking in the 1920s, and an investigation of uncertainty and the “generosity paradox” with regard to gender, sexuality, and ability in cyborg cinema.

Free access

Editorial

Situating Screen Bodies

Brian Bergen-Aurand

Free access

Editorial

Screening Vulnerability

Brian Bergen-Aurand

Free access

Screened Women

Brian Bergen-Aurand