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Index to Volume 23 (2005)

Index to Volume 23 (2005)

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Contributors

Notes on contributors

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French Cinema

Globalization, Representation, and Resistance

Graeme Hayes and Martin O'Shaughnessy

It is now twelve years since French brinkmanship pushed American negotiators and the prospects of a world trade deal to the wire, securing the exclusion of cultural products and services from the 1993 GATT agreement and the maintenance of European systems of national quotas, public subsidies, and intellectual property rights in the audiovisual sector. The intervening period has not been quiet. Although the Multilateral Agreement on Investment was sunk when Lionel Jospin pulled the plug on negotiations in October 1998, the applications of new central European entrants to join the European Union and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development have been accompanied by a continuing guerrilla battle fought by successive American administrations against the terms and scope of the exclusion.

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Memory Boom or Memory Fatigue in 21st Century Germany?

Eric Langenbacher and Friederike Eigler

Is "memory fatigue" setting in? One often hears this question in regards to Germans whenever another Holocaust-centered or Nazi era memory event erupts. But, one also increasingly hears this question about intellectuals and scholars in the humanities. Political scientists, lamentably, never really got into the study of memory in the first place. As an overly qualitative phenomenon the study of collective memory was impervious to dominant quantitative or rationalist methodologies in the discipline. Like culture more generally, it was considered either a default category or an irrelevant factor for the core of political analysis—interests and institutions—and was best left to the humanities or sociology. Others have argued that memory never really mattered at all for the vast majority of Germans who are interested in the consumerist present or for a proper understanding of the political system. At the most, it concerned only a small circle of the German elite and media such as the feuilleton section of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and Der Spiegel, and, certain German studies centers and journals in the USA.

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Contributors

Notes on contributors

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Editor's Note

I would like to take this opportunity to introduce our new managing editor to the journal's readership.

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Contributors

Notes on contributors

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Errata

In Charles Cogan’s article, “The Iraq Crisis and France: Heaven-Sent Opportunity or Problem from Hell?”, French Politics, Culture & Society 22, 3 (Fall 2004), it was stated on page 126 that on 21 December 2002 the French Chief of Staff visited the Pentagon.

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Global Cityscapes of Modernity and Post Modernity: Vienna and Berlin 1900-2000

Jeffrey M. Peck

The focus of this volume is broad, both historically and topically.

Berlin and Vienna, modernity and postmodernity, the twentieth century

and two incisive Wenden of a tumultuous millennium offer an

opportunity to examine central issues in the relationship among

European culture, history, and politics. Cities provide a rich location

to examine expressions of creativity, growth, and change over the

course of one hundred years. As a transit point of entry and exit, the

city becomes a site for exchange and cross-fertilization of peoples,

ideas, and commodities. Cities are nodes in a network whose spokes

extend beyond their metropolitan borders and bring intellectual and

physical nourishment to surrounding areas. This European century

will be known for its great cities and the production of cultural

objects that spread around the globe. Less dramatically, nevertheless

significant for the transfer of knowledge, academic figures will also

be remembered for the dissemination of these intellectual traditions

to generations of students who were fortunate to cross their paths.

Hinrich C. Seeba, professor of German at the University of California,

Berkeley, from 1967 to the present, is one such person.

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Index to Volume 22 (2004)

Index to Volume 22 (2004)