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Open access

Ben Page, Olga R. Gulina, Doğuş Şimşek, Caress Schenk, and Vidya Venkat

MIGRANT HOUSING: Architecture, Dwelling, Migration. Mirjana Lozanovska. 2019. Abingdon: Routledge. 242 pages. ISBN 9781138574090 (Hardback).

THE AGE OF MIGRATION: International Population Movements in the Modern World. 6th ed. Hein de Haas, Stephen Castles, Mark J. Mille. 2020. London: Red Globe Press. 446 pages. ISBN-13: 978-1352007985.

REFUGEE IMAGINARIES: Research across the Humanities. Emma Cox, Sam Durrant, David Farrier, Lyndsey Stonebridge, and Agnes Woolley, eds. 2020. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. 642 pages. ISBN 9781474443197 (hardback).

MIGRATION AS A (GEO-)POLITICAL CHALLENGE IN THE POST-SOVIET SPACE: Border Regimes, Policy Choices, Visa Agendas. Olga R. Gulina. 2019. Stuttgart: Ibidem Verlag. 120 pages. ISBN: 9783838213385.

COMPARATIVE REVIEW: Migration and Development in India: Provincial and Historical Perspectives

INDIA MOVING: A History of Migration. Chinmay Tumbe. 2018. New York: Penguin Viking. 285 pages. ISBN: 9780670089833.

PROVINCIAL GLOBALISATION IN INDIA: Transregional Mobilities and Development Politics. Carol Upadhya, Mario Rutten, and Leah Koskimaki, eds. 2020. New York: Routledge. 193 pages. ISBN: 978-1-138-06962-6.

Open access

Julia Ros-Cuéllar, Harlan Koff, Carmen Maganda, and Edith Kauffer

April 2021 is here, one year and a month after the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a state of emergency for the COVID-19 pandemic. The vaccines have arrived, bringing us closer to the end of this crisis, but COVID-19 is not gone; therefore, the call for action remains relevant. We want to take this opportunity to remember and embrace the emphasis that has been put on the need for joint efforts and coordinated strategies, so we can thrive together, bringing everyone on board irrespective of geographic, economic, and political differences.

Open access

Pilivet Aguiar Alayola, Christine McCoy Cador, and Lucila Zárraga Cano

Abstract

The city of Cancun, Quintana Roo, Mexico, is characterized by its tourism activity due to the tourist attractions it offers. The objective of this research is to determine the level of sustainability according to urban, environmental, fiscal, and tourism dimensions. The research methodology consists of results obtained from the model for measuring sustainability and quality of life for tourist cities, through secondary and primary data, and through an exploratory study on a sample of 416 inhabitants of the city of Cancun, Quintana Roo. The results show that Cancun has areas for improvement to contribute to sustainability.

Résumé

La ville de Cancun, au Quintana Roo, Mexique, se caractérise par son activité touristique, en raison des attractions qu'elle offre dans ce domaine. L'objectif de cette recherche est de déterminer le niveau de durabilité des dimensions urbaine, environnementale, fiscale et touristique. La méthodologie s'appuie sur les résultats obtenus à partir d'un modèle de mesure de la durabilité et de la qualité de vie des villes touristiques obtenu à travers des données secondaires et primaires pour une étude exploratoire d'un échantillon de 416 habitants de la ville de Cancun. Les résultats montrent que Cancun présente des domaines à améliorer pour contribuer à la durabilité.

Resumen

La ciudad de Cancún, Quintana Roo, México, se caracteriza por su actividad turística, debido a los atractivos turísticos que ofrece. El objetivo de esta investigación es determinar el nivel de sostenibilidad de las dimensiones urbana, ambiental, fiscal y turística. La metodología de investigación son los resultados obtenidos a partir del modelo de medición de la sostenibilidad y calidad de vida para ciudades turísticas, a través de datos secundarios y primarios, mediante un estudio exploratorio a una muestra de 416 habitantes de la ciudad de Cancún, Q. Roo. Los resultados arrojan que Cancún tiene áreas de mejora para coadyuvar a la sostenibilidad.

Open access

Mette Louise Berg, Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, and Johanna Waters

To say that working on this issue of Migration and Society has been a challenge would be an understatement. For all of us, from the members of the editorial team to our guest editors, contributors, ever-important reviewers, and the publishing team, 2020 has brought significant barriers. We have feared for the safety of our loved ones; grieved unbearable losses, often from afar; faced different forms of containment; and sought to, somehow, find the time and energy to care for our loved ones, our selves, and one another while navigating unsustainable work commitments and responsibilities.

Open access

Freedom, Salvation, Redemption

Theologies of Political Asylum

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

Abstract

The politics of religious asylum is ripe for reassessment. Even as a robust literature on secularism and religion has shown otherwise over the past two decades, much of the discussion in this field presumes that religion stands cleanly apart from law and politics. This article makes the case for a different approach to religion in the context of asylum-seeking and claiming. In the United States, it suggests, the politics of asylum is integral to the maintenance of American exceptionalism. Participants in the asylum-seeking process create a gap between Americans and others, affirming the promise of freedom, salvation, and redemption through conversion not to a particular religion or faith but to the American project itself. This hails a particular kind of subject of freedom and unencumbered choice. It is both a theological and a political process.

Open access

Immigrant Sanctuary or Danger

Health Care and Hospitals in the United States

Beatrix Hoffman

Abstract

Hospitals have for centuries been considered safe havens for immigrants and people on the move. However, immigrants and migrants who seek health care have also been targeted for exclusion and deportation. This article discusses the history of how hospitals and health care facilities in the United States have acted both as sanctuaries and as sites of immigration enforcement. This debate came to a head in California in the 1970s, when conservatives began attacking local public health facilities’ informal sanctuary practices. Following the California battles, which culminated in Proposition 187 in 1994, immigrant rights movements have increasingly connected calls for sanctuary with demands for a right to health care.

Open access

“It's a Big Umbrella”

Uncertainty, Pentecostalism, and the Integration of Zimbabwe Exemption Permit Immigrants in Johannesburg, South Africa

Tinashe Chimbidzikai

Abstract

This article questions the dominant narrative that considers displaced persons as victims, powerless, and lacking agency to shape their individual and collective conditions. Based on an ethnographic study of largely Zimbabwe Exemption Permit holders living in Johannesburg, the article argues that Pentecostalism offers an alternate worldview that draws on religious beliefs and practices to express triumph over everyday adversities and vicissitudes of forced mobility. The article concludes that such beliefs and practices embolden and espouse individual and collective agency among “born-again” migrants, as they mobilize religious social networks for individuals to make sense of the uncertainties engendered by displacement.

Open access

Gilad Ben-Nun

Abstract

This article examines Jewish law's approach to forced migration. It explains the difference under Jewish law between forced migration brought about by disasters and the state of being a refugee—which is directly associated with war and armed conflict. It continues by demonstrating how these distinctions influenced the religious Jewish authors of the 1951 Refugee Convention. It concludes with the fundamental distinction between Jewish law and Roman law, concerning the latter's application of a strong differentiation between citizens and migrant foreigners, which under Jewish law was entirely proscribed as per the religious duty to accord hospitality to forced migrants irrespective of their background.

Open access

Juan Alberto Gran Castro and Silvia Lizette Ramos de Robles

Abstract

The objective of this article is to analyze the perceptions of those who live in a context of marginalization and urban poverty as to their awareness of any risks to health and well-being associated with climate change. The methodological framework for this study was qualitative and ethnographic. The main sources of information were semi-structured interviews with residents of El Colli, located in Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico who are parents. We conclude that there are climate change-induced environmental regional particularities that result in unequal conditions of vulnerability and a greater occurrence of risk events for populations in marginalized and poor areas. Thus, we argue that the theoretical and methodological references that consider local knowledge are key to enabling adaptation measures aimed at social welfare.

Resumen

El objetivo de este artículo es analizar la percepción sobre riesgos a la salud y el bienestar asociados al cambio climático, a partir de las experiencias cotidianas de vivir en un contexto de marginación y pobreza urbana. La perspectiva metodológica fue de carácter cualitativo y de cohorte etnográfico, cuya principal fuente de información fueron entrevistas semiestructuradas a los padres y madres de familia, habitantes de El Colli, ubicado en Zapopan, Jalisco, México. Concluimos que las particularidades regionales a escala local enfrentan impactos específicos asociados al cambio climático según las condiciones desiguales de vulnerabilidad entre la población y la ocurrencia de eventos riesgosos. Así, sostenemos que los referentes teórico-metodológicos que consideren el conocimiento local son clave para propiciar medidas de adaptación encaminadas al bienestar social.

Résumé

L'objectif de cet article est d'analyser la perception des risques pour la santé et le bien-être liés au changement climatique à partir des expériences quotidiennes de vie dans un contexte de marginalisation et de pauvreté urbaine. La méthodologie adoptée s'appuie sur une cohorte qualitative et ethnographique, dont la principale source sont des entretiens semi-structurés avec des parents résidant à El Colli, situé à Zapopan, au Jalisco, Mexique. Nous concluons que le changement climatique a des répercussions spécifiques en fonction des particularités régionales à l'échelle locale, notamment des conditions inégales de vulnérabilité de la population et de la survenue d'événements à risque. Ainsi, nous soutenons que les références théoriques et méthodologiques qui prennent en compte les connaissances locales sont essentielles pour promouvoir des mesures d'adaptation visant le bien-être social.

Open access

Rebecca M. Schreiber

Abstract

This article examines how Central American migrant and refugee youth imagine forms of sanctuary through collaborative artwork as part of a series of Arte Urgente (Urgent Art) workshops led by artist Caleb Duarte. This artwork involved a critical embodiment and reenvisioning of their past and present experiences in the form of performance. In addition, their creation of a symbolic Embassy of the Refugee was an imaginative way of asserting their right to protection. This article examines how members of affected communities have made artistic interventions into public spaces to focus attention on the nation-state as a site of crisis as well as envision autonomous, noninstitutional sanctuary spaces for each other, while also engaging in ongoing practices of solidarity with other displaced people.