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Trajectoires numériques de la chronique judiciaire

DSK et le procès Carlton dans Le Monde, entre écrit et écran

Adeline Wrona

Abstract

This article analyses how the “digitizing” of the press transforms the writing of news in France, through the case of a recent trial, the “Carlton affair” in February 2015. The example chosen is that of Le Monde, which dedicates a blog to legal affairs that is overseen by an experienced journalist who also covers the same questions for the print version of the paper. How does the author take advantage of this double space of publication? Which kind of writing is the freer and the more literary or sophisticated? It appears that web newswriting does not give much importance to the dialog with the reader, but is rather an opportunity to try out ways of telling the story before giving it to the print version. In court journalism the print press still commands the greater prestige and gets more editorial support, whereas blogs or other digital content are used to compensate for the lack of space in the daily press.

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Trying on the Veil

Sexual Autonomy and the End of the French Republic in Michel Houellebecq’s Submission

Seth Armus

Abstract

Michel Houellebecq has an unusual gift for revealing the nervous underside of modern life, so when his “futuristic” novel about an Islamic France, Submission, was released on the very day of the Charlie Hebdo attacks, the coincidence was both horrific and apropos. Most criticism focuses on the anti-Muslim and anti-Enlightenment elements of the novel, but in this article I argue that Submission should be seen primarily as an engaged work of cultural politics. Houellebecq, measuring the temperature of today’s France, presents a culturally collapsed nation of the near future and focuses on women and Jews as the victims—sacrificed, as it were, by the secular elite. In so doing, I maintain, he pulls heavily from current events, all the while drawing on the memory of Vichy and the Occupation. The novel’s premises, topical at the time of its publication, are even more so today.

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Camille Robcis and Benjamin Poole

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Féministes et républicaines

Parcours de femmes à l’origine du CNFF (1880–1901)

Yolande Cohen

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From Political Fringe to Political Mainstream

The Front National and the 2014 Municipal Elections in France

Gabriel Goodliffe

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Scott Gunther

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Marrying into the Nation

Immigrant Bachelors, French Bureaucrats, and the Conjugal Politics of Naturalization in the Third Republic

Nimisha Barton