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Oded Haklai, Ronnie Olesker, Mira Sucharov, Ehud Eiran, and Ian S. Lustick

Ian S. Lustick, Paradigm Lost: From Two-State Solution to One-State Reality (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019).

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Elia Etkin, Tal Elmaliach, and Motti Inbari

Laura Wharton, Is the Party Over? How Israel Lost Its Social Agenda (Jerusalem: Yad Levi Eshkol, 2019), 432 pp. Paperback, $29.95.

Fiona Wright, The Israeli Radical Left: An Ethics of Complicity (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018), 208 pp. Hardback, $69.95.

Daniel Mahla, Orthodox Judaism and the Politics of Religion: From Prewar Europe to the State of Israel (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020), 318 pp. Hardback, $99.99.

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Naomi Caffee, Paul Dukes, and Aimar Ventsel

Mists on the River: Folktales from Siberia Yeremei Aipin, Translated by Marina Aipin and Claude Clayton Smith (Brunswick, ME: Shanti Arts Publishing, 2020), 51 pp. ISBN 978-1-951651-40-4.

Regional'naia elita Dal'nego Vostoka v mekhanizme vneshnei politiki: Dokumental'naia istoriia voennogo konflikta na KVZHD mezhdu SSSR i Kitaem, 1929 Marina Fuchs (New York: South Eastern Publishers, 2020), 513 pp., 570 notes, with a summary in English, 54 pp.

Lifestyle in Siberia and the Russian North Joachim Otto Habeck, ed. (Cambridge, UK: Open Book, 2019), 490 pp. ISBN paperback: 978-1-78374-717-7; ISBN cloth: 978-1-78374-718-4.

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Bridges or Walls? Or Bridges are Walls?

Hegemony, Situational Selection and Counter Narratives at the Boundaries of Spain and Europe

Elaine McIlwraith

This Forum contribution considers the idea of bridges and walls. It compares two cultural programmes in Granada, Andalusia, that use the concepts of ‘dialogue’ and ‘tolerance’ along with the idea of a bridge between Spain and Europe, and the Arab-Islamic world. Ethnographic data suggest that the idea of bridges and walls are not always mutually exclusive. The former can incorporate subtleties that reinforce the latter. Consolidation of either depends on how closely hegemonic and subaltern narratives align. Even when bridge narratives have a significant presence within a country, ideas of walls at national borders reinforce the exclusion of an imagined ‘Other’. Considering hegemonic processes helps to clarify the emergence of these narratives and their effects on both cross-border and local ethnic connections.

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Building Bridges over Troubled Waters

EU Civil Servants and the Transcendence of Distance and Difference

Seamus Montgomery

This Forum contribution presents fragmented accounts of historical narratives collected while conducting ethnographic fieldwork among civil servants in and around the European Commission in Brussels, Belgium. It focuses on the roles that heritage-making practices play in articulating European identity and belonging within these institutional spaces. In the ongoing debates over ‘bridges’ and ‘walls’, Commission officials advocate building the former and tearing down the latter. The European heritage narratives they enact tell the story of a supranational community formed from the expansion of external borders and the elimination of internal ones. Through the transcendence of borders, both physical and cognitive, geographic distances and social differences are made increasingly irrelevant. Their efforts in this regard are nonetheless hindered by futurist temporalities that orient Europeanness in opposition to the past.

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Fernando Antonio Ignacio González, Maria Emma Santos, and Silvia London

Abstract

This article analyses the recent evolution of territorial disparities in Argentina, measured by a Multidimensional Poverty Index, by carrying out a formal convergence analysis between agglomerates. In particular, the existence of absolute β-convergence and σ-convergence is tested. The information comes from the microdata of the Permanent Household Survey. The results suggest that, although an end-to-end analysis of the period shows a decrease in poverty accompanied by a reduction in territorial disparities between the main urban agglomerates in Argentina, when disaggregating by subperiods, it is evident that in periods of economic growth (essentially from 2003 to 2009), territorial disparities increased. Conversely, in periods of stagnation, these disparities decrease.

Resumen

Este articulo analiza la evolución reciente de las disparidades territoriales en Argentina, medida por un Índice de Pobreza Multidimensional, mediante un análisis formal de convergencia entre aglomerados. En particular, se testea la existencia de convergencia-β absoluta y convergencia-σ. La información proviene de los microdatos de la Encuesta Permanente de Hogares. Los resultados sugieren que, si bien en un análisis punta-a-punta del período se observa una reducción de la pobreza acompañada de una reducción de las disparidades territoriales entre los principales aglomerados urbanos de Argentina, al desagregar por subperíodos, se evidencia que en los períodos de crecimiento económico (esencialmente del 2003 al 2009) se incrementaron las disparidades territoriales. En tanto que en los periodos de estancamiento, estas disparidades se redujeron.

Résumé

Ce travail analyse l'évolution récente des disparités territoriales en Argentine, mesurée à partir d'un Indice multidimensionnel de la pauvreté, sur la base d'une étude de la convergence entre les agglomérations urbaines. Il teste en particulier l'existence de la beta convergence absolue et de la sigma convergence. Les informations proviennent de microdonnées de l'Enquête permanente des ménages. Bien qu'une analyse ponctuelle de la période montre une réduction générale de la pauvreté accompagnée d'une réduction des disparités territoriales entre les principales agglomérations urbaines d'Argentine, la désagrégation par sous-périodes permet d'observer que pendant les périodes de croissance économique (essentiellement de 2003 à 2009), les disparités territoriales se sont accrues alors qu'en période de stagnation elles se sont réduites.

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Cross-Border Cultural Cooperation in European Border Regions

Sites and Senses of ‘Place’ across the Irish Border

Giada Laganà and Timothy J. White

The growing interaction between local cultures and international organisations suggests the need for peacebuilders to act strategically when trying to overcome cultural differences and build trust in societies long divided by bloody conflicts. This task is more difficult because the mental barriers that divide people and cultures are exacerbated by borders and walls. Through an analysis of the evolving role of the European Union (EU) in peacebuilding in the border region of Ireland, this forum contribution examines the potential of international organisations to enhance reconciliation by creating new cultural opportunities for cooperation. Existing scholarship focuses mainly on policy initiatives, strategies, directives and funding bodies, often failing to mention how theories are deployed by practitioners especially in the realm of cultural programmes.

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David Farrell-Banks

Right-wing populist, nationalist and extremist groups frequently make discursive use of the past to support their political agenda. This contribution briefly examines the use of the 1683 Siege of Vienna in political discourses. It shows how certain parts of European heritage are mobilised globally to present a singular view of European identity as white and Christian. This identity is constructed in opposition to a Muslim and migrant ‘other’. The contribution shows that this notion of European identity is used not as a call for European unity, but to serve nationalistic needs when utilised by far-right groups. Moreover, this piece calls for greater recognition of how heritages are mobilised across borders in the interests of advancing a politics of exclusion and division.

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Philip McDermott and Sara McDowell

Does cultural heritage create either bridges of engagement or walls of division within and beyond Europe? To capture these diverse interpretations, we provide some initial discussion on the concept of heritage and how this relates to identity, memory and the past. In order to introduce the various studies that comprise the forum, we identify a series of collective themes explored by our contributors. These are: the use of heritage sites and practices as a means of exploring questions of European unity; the idea of a decolonizing heritage alongside the reframing of contested transcultural encounters; and finally, the potential for heritage as a form of conflict resolution.

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Hubert Wierciński

This paper explores the problem of knowledge and knowledge making among Polish primary care doctors. Following Kirsten Hastrup and Tim Ingold, I argue that doctors are skilful social-weavers capable of exploring and reconciling various orders of knowledge. Thus, through a diverse set of knowledgeable yarns – originating from professional and state regimes, and embedded in today’s social relationships and economies – doctors are involved in the art of weaving a fabric composed of many, it would seem, contradictory orders of knowledge. The fabric in question is one in a constant state of reworking – although it is one that establishes a meaningful and knowledgeable environment in which the doctors can perform.