Browse

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 11,336 items for

  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Jacob Breslow, Jonathan A. Allan, Gregory Wolfman, and Clifton Evers

Miriam J. Abelson. Men in Place: Trans Masculinity, Race, and Sexuality in America (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2020), 264 pp. ISBN: 9781517903510. Paperback, $25.

Andrew Reilly and Ben Barry, eds. Crossing Gender Boundaries: Fashion to Create, Disrupt and Transcend (Bristol: Intellect Books, 2020), 225 pp. ISBN: 9781789381146. Hardback, $106.50.

Jonathan A. Allan. Men, Masculinities, and Popular Romance (London: Routledge, 2019), 176 pp. ISBN: 9780815374077. Paperback, $31.95.

Andrea Waling. White Masculinity in Contemporary Australia: The Good Ol’ Aussie Bloke (Abingdon, UK: Routledge, 2020), 222 pp. ISBN: 9781138633285. Hardback, $124.

Restricted access

Hilla Daya, Anat Stern, Roman Vater, Yoav Peled, Neta Oren, Tally Kritzman-Amir, Oded Haklai, Dov Waxman, Raphael Cohen-Almagor, Alan Dowty, and Raffaella A. Del Sarto

Yael Berda, Living Emergency: Israel’s Permit Regime in the Occupied West Bank (Stanford, CA: Stanford Briefs, 2018), 152 pp. Paperback, $14.00.

Randall S. Geller, Minorities in the Israeli Military, 1948–58 (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2017), 238 pp. Hardback, $100.00. eBook, $95.00.

Yaacov Yadgar, Israel’s Jewish Identity Crisis: State and Politics in the Middle East (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020), 226 pp. Paperback, $26.99. Kindle, $16.99.

Ian S. Lustick, Paradigm Lost: From Two-State Solution to One-State Reality (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019), 232 pp. Hardback, $27.50.

Ilan Peleg, ed., Victimhood Discourse in Contemporary Israel (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2019), 222 pp. Hardback, $90.00.

Sarah S. Willen, Fighting for Dignity: Migrant Lives at Israel’s Margins (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019), 344 pp. Hardback, $89.95.

As’ad Ghanem and Mohanad Mustafa, Palestinians in Israel: The Politics of Faith after Oslo (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018), 206 pp. Paperback, $29.99.

Daniel G. Hummel, Covenant Brothers: Evangelicals, Jews, and U.S.-Israeli Relations (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019), 352 pp. Hardback, $49.95.

Cary Nelson, Israel Denial: Anti-Zionism, Anti-Semitism, and the Faculty Campaign Against the Jewish State (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2019), 658 pp. Hardback, $45.00. Kindle, $7.99.

Letters to the Editors

Restricted access

Melissa Raphael, Dorothea Magonet, and Frank Dabba Smith

Tony Bayfield, Being Jewish Today: Confronting the Real Issues, Bloomsbury Continuum, 2019, £18.99

Marika Henriques, The Hidden Girl: The Journey of a Soul, Shepheard-Walwyn Publishers Ltd., 2018, £25.00

Marc Saperstein, Agony in the Pulpit: Jewish Preaching in Response to Nazi Persecution and Mass Murder 1933–1945, Hebrew Union College Press, 2018, $95.00

Restricted access

Breaching Flowery Borders

Early Twentieth Century Girls Scrapbooking Their Lives

Leslie Midkiff DeBauche

The American high school seniors I discuss in this article graduated between 1915 and 1922, tumultuous years that included World War I, the influenza pandemic of 1918 to 1919, and the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment. During such extraordinary times, these girls did a most ordinary thing; they made scrapbooks to commemorate their high school years.

Open access

Capturing Crisis

Solar Power and Humanitarian Energy Markets in Africa

Jamie Cross

Abstract

Goudebou refugee camp in northern Burkina Faso has emerged as a testing ground for international efforts to find market-based solutions to the delivery of basic energy services in humanitarian contexts. This article follows energy researchers, humanitarian practitioners and entrepreneurs as they work to capture a market for energy here by mapping consumer demand, generating evidence that can prove the willingness of refugees to pay and securing contracts for the supply of solar powered technologies. Their efforts reveal the moral and material logics of humanitarian interventions in the field of energy, and point to the continued significance of ‘crisis’ for the making of Africa's energy politics, subjects and futures.

Open access

Carceral Repair

Methane Extraction in Lake Kivu, Rwanda

Kristin Doughty

Abstract

This article, based on ethnographic fieldwork in 2016–2019, examines methane extraction operations in Lake Kivu on the Rwanda/DRC border as a lens into understanding how energy futures in Africa are imagined and enacted within national projects of post-war reconstruction. In 2005, scientists suggested that the lake's dissolved methane risked oversaturation within the century. This spurred state-backed projects to simultaneously prevent a natural disaster and harness the methane to meet Rwanda's rising electrification needs. Two companies are currently building and operating methane-fuelled power plants. The article suggests that these energy projects, an integral part of the overall architecture of social repair in Rwanda, reproduce and generate forms of captivity and entrapment that are central to understanding the lived politics of ‘carceral repair’, a generation after genocide.

Restricted access

Colonising ‘Free’ Will

A Critique of Political Decolonisation in Ghana

Bernard Forjwuor

Abstract

While colonialism, in general, is a contested concept, as are the conditions that constitute its negation, political decolonisation seems to be a relatively settled argument. Where such decolonisation occurred, political independence, and its attendant democratic system and the undergirding of the rule of law, signify the self-evidentiality of such political decolonisation. This article rethinks this self-evidentiality of political independence as necessarily a decolonial political accomplishment in Ghana. This critical enterprise opens the documents that founded the newly independent state to alternative reading to demonstrate how the colonial folded itself into the dictate of freedom.

Free access

Nir Gazit and Levy Yagil

The murder of George Floyd by a police officer in the United States in May 2020 and the subsequent turmoil, as well as the violence against migrants on the US-Mexican border, have drawn major public and media attention to the phenomenon of police brutality (see, e.g., Levin 2020; Misra 2018; Taub 2020), which is often labeled as ‘militarization of police’. At the same time, in recent years military forces have been increasingly involved in policing missions in civilian environments, both domestically (see, e.g., Kanno-Youngs 2020; Schrader 2020; Shinkman 2020) and abroad. The convergence of military conduct and policing raises intriguing questions regarding the impact of these tendencies on the military and the police, as well as on their legitimacy.

Open access

Crafting Spaces of Value

Infrastructure, Technologies of Extraction and Contested Oil in Nigeria

Omolade Adunbi

Abstract

This ethnographic investigation of the rise of the artisanal oil refining industry in the Niger Delta, Nigeria, shows how oil infrastructures have become contested between the state, multinational oil corporations and local youths in what I call a ‘new oil frontier’. I argue that artisanal refineries are indicative of the politics of crude oil governance and reveal complex, integrated and innovative forms of extractive practices by youth groups within many Niger Delta communities. Using the example of the Bodo community in Ogoniland, where local youths operate refineries constructed with local materials and technology, I show that such refineries represent an emergent form of energy capture that transforms the creeks of the Niger Delta into islands of carbon sale and challenges state and corporate power.

Restricted access

James K. Beggan

Abstract

External ejaculation (the cum shot) is considered a central component of heterosexual pornography and is often used to visually mark the end of an action of sexual intercourse. Critical analyses of pornography have asserted that external ejaculation can be conceptualized in terms of the maintenance of heteronormative expectations of male dominance as expressed through hegemonic masculinity. The present analysis adopts a broader view of external ejaculation by considering the phenomenon in terms of contamination, performance, and discipline. The polysemic analysis presented suggests that in some cases the conventions of pornography as represented in the external cum shot can represent a threat to masculinity and male spectators by creating unrealistic expectations for male sexual performance.