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Niklas Olsen, Irene Herrmann, Håvard Brede Aven and Mohinder Singh

Crisis and Existentialism in the Work of Reinhart Koselleck

Gennaro Imbriano, Der Begriff der Politik: Die Moderne als Krisenzeit im Werk von Reinhart Koselleck [The concept of politics: Modernity as a time of crisis in the work of Reinhart Koselleck] (Frankfurt: Campus Verlag, 2018), 187 pp.

Jan Eike Dunkhase, Absurde Geschichte: Reinhart Kosellecks historischer Existentialismus [Absurd history: Reinhart Koselleck’s historical existentialism] (Marbach: Deutschen Literaturarchiv Marbach, 2015), 67 pp. --- Humanity in Practice: New Approaches to Conceptual History

Fabian Klose and Mirjam Thulin, eds., Humanity: A History of European Concepts in Practice from the Sixteenth Century to the Present (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2016), 324 pp. --- The Merits of Mistranslation

Eric Schatzberg, Technology: Critical History of a Concept (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018), 344 pp. --- Beyond Universalism and Nativism: The Conceptual Vocabulary of Indian Modernity

Gita Dharmpal-Frick, Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach, Rachel Dwyer, and Jahnavi Phalkey, eds., Key Concepts in Modern Indian Studies (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2015), 350 pp.

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Book Reviews

On Machiavelli as Plebeian Theorist

Marc Stears, Jérémie Barthas and Adam Woodhouse

Reading Machiavelli: Scandalous Books, Suspects Engagements, and the Virtue of Populist Politics, by John McCormick. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2018. 288 pp.

Machiavelli in Tumult. The Discourses on Livy and the Origins of Political Conflictualism, by Gabriele Pedullà. Translated by Patricia Gaborik and Richard Nybakken. Revised and updated by the author. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2018. xix + 284 pp.

Machiavelli and the Orders of Violence, by Yves Winter. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. 230 pp.

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Nicholas Ferns, David Farley, Sue Beeton, Paula Mota Santos and Rachel Luchmun

Carla Manfredi. Robert Louis Stevenson’s Pacific Impressions: Photography and Travel Writing, 1888–1894 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018), 256 pp., ISBN: 978-3-319-98312-7, €69.99 (hardcover).

Richard Ivan Jobs. Backpack Ambassadors: How Youth Travel Integrated Europe (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017) 360pp, ISBN-13: 978-0-226-46203-5, $35.00 (paper).

Youngmin Choe. Tourist Distractions: Travelling and Feeling in Transnational Hallyu Cinema (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2016), xii + 252pp., ISBN-978-0-8223-6130-5, $60.99 (pbk).

Valerio Simoni. Tourism and Informal Encounters in Cuba (Oxford; Berghahn, 2016), 282+xvi pp, ISBN 978-1-78533-833-5, $27.95 (paperback).

Sabine Marschall. Tourism and Memories of Home: Migrants, Displaced People, Exiles and Diasporic Communities (Bristol: Channel View Publications, 2017), xv + 288 pp., ISBN 13: 978-1-84541-602-7, $49.95 (paperback).

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Meron Medzini, Sheila Jelen, Amalia Ran and Russell A. Stone

Neil Caplan and Yaakov Sharett, eds., My Struggle for Peace: The Diary of Moshe Sharett, 1953–1956 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2019), 3 vols. 1,950 pp. Hardback, $125.00.

Adia Mendelson-Maoz, Borders, Territories, and Ethics: Hebrew Literature in the Shadow of the Intifada (West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 2018), 252 pp. Paperback, $30.00. Kindle, $26.00.

Alejandro Paz, Latinos in Israel: Language and Unexpected Citizenship (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2018), 327 pp. Hardback, $75.00. Paperback, $32.00. Kindle, $20.00.

Neta Oren, Israel’s National Identity: The Changing Ethos of Conflict (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2019), 291 pp. Hardback, $65.00.

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Fredrik Nyman, Roberta Zavoretti, Linda Rabben and David M. R. Orr

Breast Cancer Meanings: Journeys across Asia. Cynthia Chou and Miriam Koktvedgaard Zeitzen (eds), Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2018, ISBN: 978- 87-7694-242-7, 304 pp., Hb. £65 / Pb. £22.50.

The Look of a Woman: Facial Feminization Surgery and the Aims of Trans-Medicine. Eric Plemons, Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2017, ISBN: 978-0-8223-6914-1, 208 pp., Pb $24.95 / Hb $94.95.

Refuge beyond Reach: How Rich Democracies Repel Asylum Seekers. David Scott FitzGerald, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019, ISBN: 978-01-9087-415-5, 359 pp., Hb. $34.95.

Detain and Deport: The Chaotic U.S. Immigration Enforcement Regime. Nancy Hiemstra, Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2019, ISBN: 978-08-2035-463-7, 182 pp., Pb. $29.95.

Framing a Lost City: Science, Photography, and the Making of Machu Picchu. Amy Cox Hall, Austin: University of Texas Press, 2017, ISBN: 978-1-4773-1368-8, 267 pp., Pb. $29.95.

Making Machu Picchu: The Politics of Tourism in Twentieth-Century Peru Mark Rice, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2018, ISBN: 978-1-4696-4353-3, 233 pp., Pb. $31.95.

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Anthropology in Action is always happy to hear from potential reviewers at all stages in their academic careers, for books, films or other media. We currently have a number of books and video resources awaiting review. If you are interested in reviewing anything on the list below, please contact the reviews editor David Orr (d.orr@sussex.ac.uk).

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A Booming City in the Far North

Demographic and Migration Dynamics of Yakutsk, Russia

Svetlana Sukneva and Marlene Laruelle

Many cities of Russia’s Far North face a massive population decline, with the exception of those based on oil and gas extraction in the Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous District. Yet, there is one more exception to that trend: the city of Yakutsk, capital of the Sakha (Yakutia) Republic, whose population is booming, having grown from 186,000 in 1989 to 338,000 in 2018, This unique demographic dynamism is founded on the massive exodus of the ethnic Yakut population from rural parts of the republic to the capital city, a process that has reshaped the urban cultural landscape, making Yakutsk a genuine indigenous regional capital, the only one of its kind in the Russian Far North.

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Borders and justice

A postscript

Mary Bosworth

In this piece I offer an overview of the theme section and reflect on the relationship between academic studies and social justice. By comparing anthropology with my home discipline of criminology, I point to some shared and distinct contributions practitioners in these fields can make to our understanding about border control. Without being too pessimistic, I warn about the limits of ‘humanizing’ research subjects as a means to bring about progressive change, and suggest instead, drawing on the work of the theme section, that more needs to be done alongside and with individuals and local communities.

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Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Practice

Democratic Theory through an Agonistic Lens

Marie Paxton

This article seeks to explore democratic theory by focusing on the example of agonistic democracy, in which contest between citizens is valued for its potential to render politics more inclusive, more engaging, and more virtuous. Using Connolly and Tully’s inclusivism, Chantal Mouffe’s adversarialism, and David Owen’s perfectionism, the article discusses democratic theory as a critique, a series of normative proposals, and a potential bridge between political theory and public policy. It is this bridge that enables democratic theory to pull together critical and normative discussions with those surrounding public policy and institutional design.

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Clarifying Liquidity

Keynes and Marx, Merchants, and Poets

Rolf Hugoson

This article is a history of liquidity presented as interaction between metaphors and theoretical concepts in social contexts. While taking note of Zygmunt Bauman’s metaphor “liquid modernity,” the study instead surveys the wider conceptual field. The text turns around mercantile liquidity (liquidity as clarification) and liquidity in modern economics (characteristic of all assets), as well as older metaphors, notably the famous phrase of the Communist Manifesto, “all that is solid melts into air” (Alles Ständische und Stehende verdampft), which is revealed to have resonance in texts by poets, notably Heinrich Heine. The main result is the historical consistency of the field, where liquidity is a promise of knowledge and clarity.