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Crossing Boundaries

The Case of Wanda Wasilewska and Polish Communism

Agnieszka Mrozik

themselves and their environment. As Michel Foucault wrote: “Revolution … was [for communists] not just a political project; it was also a form of life.” 2 In one of his lectures delivered at the Collège de France in the early 1980s, Foucault noted that since

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Women and Gender in Europe from 1939 to the Present

Challenging and Reassessing the Narrative

Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild

Weill-Hallé? Dr. Weill-Hallé “disrupted the silence about contraception in France”; Katja Vodopivec was one of the founders of the field of social work in Yugoslavia; Maria Jančar established the School of Social Work, now a part of the University of

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Paternalism, Modernization, and the Gender Regime in Turkey

Pınar Melis Yelsalı Parmaksız

, and communists in interwar France used paternalistic claims to reconcile the often conflicting interests of fathers, families and the nation. 22 In a different but relevant context, American anthropologist Katherine Verdery speaks about radical

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Gender Tutelage and Bulgarian Women’s Literature (1878–1944)

Valentina Mitkova

.), but overall falls within the theoretical field known as book history, a sphere of study, established as a separate discipline in the Western tradition in the 1950s, emanating from the École des Annales in France and related to the attempt to reach a

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Book Reviews

Johanna Gehmacher, Svetla Baloutzova, Orlin Sabev, Nezihe Bilhan, Tsvetelin Stepanov, Evgenia Kalinova, Zorana Antonijevic, Alexandra Ghit, Chiara Bonfiglioli, Ana Luleva, Barbara Klich-Kluczewska, Courtney Doucette, Katarzyna Stańczak-Wiślicz, Valentina Mitkova, Vjollca Krasniqi, Pepka Boyadjieva, Marina Hughson, and Rayna Gavrilova

1960s onward by a transnational feminist movement. Its protagonists, languages, concepts, and interest circulated in a fruitful exchange between countries—her examples show that this was especially the case for the German-speaking countries, France, and

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Feminisms and Politics in the Interwar Period

The Little Entente of Women (1923–1938)

Katerina Dalakoura

participation in the LEW, on the contrary, attributed to it purely political aims, arguing that it was a means for the implementation of French foreign policy and functioned “as a supplement of the Little Entente.” 33 These positions were expressed both while

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Introduction

Maria Bucur, Katerina Dalakoura, Krassimira Daskalova, and Gabriela Dudeková Kováčová

The decade following World War I was transformative for Europe in many ways. Some empires (Russian, Habsburg, Ottoman) collapsed. Others (Great Britain, France) saw their stars rise again as “protectors” of non-European territories, in effect

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The Little Entente of Women, Feminisms, Tensions, and Entanglements within the Interwar European Women's Movement

Krassimira Daskalova

support of the French delegation, the new organization chose to be represented by the Greek feminist Avra Theodoropoulou. 6 The goals of the LEW—transnational collaboration and actions for resolving “the woman question”—were already visible in the

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Between Transnational Cooperation and Nationalism

The Little Entente of Women in Czechoslovakia

Gabriela Dudeková Kováčová

Warsaw conference. Documents prepared for the meeting mentioned the proposed name in French as “l'Union féministe et pacifiste des femmes du Sud-Est Européen,” but it was not accepted or even discussed further. 35 The 1929 LEW conference in Warsaw was

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A Woman Politician in the Cold War Balkans

From Biography to History

Krassimira Daskalova

the Women’s International Democratic Federation, or WIDF—to which they belonged. The WIDF was a left-wing organization, established in Paris in 1945 with the French scientist and feminist Eugenie Cotton (1881–1967) in charge; it had a broad political