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Philip Cowan

-length mirror, almost creating the infinite image familiar in Kane . Lieberman and Hegarty acknowledge German Expressionism’s influence on Toland (2010: 35), and I would consider that collaborating with Freund on Mad Love would have been a seminal moment for

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Disrupted PECMA Flows

A Cognitive Approach to the Experience of Narrative Complexity in Film

Veerle Ros and Miklós Kiss

Moving Image, Berlin University of the Arts , Germany . Wojciehowski , Hannah , and Vittorio Gallese . 2011 . “ How Stories Make Us Feel: Toward an Embodied Narratology .” California Italian Studies Journal 2 ( 1 ). http

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Andrew J. Webber

on Cate Shortland’s 2012 feature Lore , a German-Australian co-production based on Rachel Seiffert’s narrative of the same name from The Dark Room (2001) and shot in Germany, in German, with a German cast. The film, set at the end of World War II

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The Editors

As we complete our second year of publication, we notice how international our journal has become. We now receive submissions and publish writing from France, Italy, England, Scotland, Israel, Spain, Germany, Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Australia, and the United States. We imagine that this list will continue to grow because of the ubiquitous nature of both film and the disciplines we bring to bear on the subject of the motion picture. This internationalism is made possible by new technologies in communication, and also by the continuing internationalism of the English language. Film has been the most international of art forms since its origins and it seems only fitting that film studies should be a joint collaboration of writers from around the globe.

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Daisuke Miyao

The process of modernization in Japan appeared as a separation of the senses and remapping of the body, particularly privileging the sense of vision. How did the filmmakers, critics, and novelists in the 1920s and 1930s respond to such a reorganization of the body and the elevation of vision in the context of film culture? How did they formulate a cinematic discourse on remapping the body when the status of cinema was still in flux and its definition was debated? Focusing on cinematic commentary made by different writers, this article tackles these questions. Sato Haruo, Ozu Yasujiro, and Iwasaki Akira questioned the separation of the senses, which was often enforced by state. Inspired by German cinema released in Japan at that time, they explored the notion of the haptic in cinema and problematized the privileged sense of vision in this new visual medium.

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Hannah Birr

It has become a commonplace that the audience of a film is active. What sort of activity is involved when the audience is from one culture—say, Germany—and the film is from another culture—say, India? This article examines the processes involved in such cross-cultural film reception. It focuses on two aspects that are often regarded as problematic for the enjoyment of a film in terms of understanding and emotional response. The first is an obviously characteristic feature of Hindi cinema, namely the song and dance sequences. The second is perhaps less obvious, but no less characteristic—intertextuality and self-referential humor. The example explored in the article—Farah Khan's Om Shanti Om—displays a multitude of ironic allusions to the history of the Indian film industry and other culturally specific elements, which present a special challenge to uninformed audiences. In this context the article concentrates on a segment of active viewers that has at least some degree of familiarity with, but, more important, expresses a definite interest in Hindi cinema: Western (non-Indian) fans. The article argues that it is a misconception to regard cultural particularity as essentially problematic. On the contrary, elements that initially seem to present a hindrance might actually facilitate the development of empathy and identification. The point is perhaps particularly true in the social context of fan (culture) reception and offers some explanation for the films' cross-cultural appeal.

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Keyvan Sarkhosh and Winfried Menninghaus

German Title Year Country Director(s) Writer(s) Genre(s) Love Actually Tatsächlich… Liebe 2003 UK | USA | France Richard Curtis Richard Curtis Comedy | Drama | Romance Le fabuleux destin d'Amélie Poulain Die

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Tru Leverette and Barbara Mennel

Bauhaus, the German art-and-design school (1919 to 1933), not only with a focus on bodies but also on gender, sexuality, and everyday life. Leadership moved from founding director, architect Walter Gropius, to Hannes Meyer, and then Ludwig Mies van der

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Transitions Within Queer North African Cinema

Nouri Bouzid, Abdellah Taïa, and the Transnational Tourist

Walter S. Temple

trappings of gay sexual tourism, and it is also a symbolic marker of his “Arab” heterosexual masculinity. But in a rather ironic twist, what makes Roufa’s voyage (and future marriage) possible in the first place is the aid of a former male German lover who

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Karen Fiss

German legislation.” The second part of the project was the live event Genitals on Trial that took place within the context of the larger exhibition. Visitors to the nGbK were invited to become part of the performance by entering a private recording