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Militaristic Discourse in Secondary Education History Textbooks during and after the Soeharto Era

Hieronymus Purwanta

the semester system into a quarterly system. Second, the History Education of the National Struggle ( Pendidikan Sejarah Perjuangan Bangsa (PSPB), which had been added to the 1984 curriculum, was removed. Third, the lessons were restructured to

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“Historical Falsification” as a Master Trope in the Official Discourse on History Education in Putin’s Russia

Julie Fedor

This article explores a key claim underpinning Russian official memory politics, namely, the notion that Russia’s past (and especially the role it played in the Second World War) is the object of a campaign of “historical falsification” aimed at, among other things, undermining Russian sovereignty, especially by distorting young people’s historical consciousness. Although “historical falsification” is an important keyword in the Kremlin’s discourse, it has received little scholarly attention. Via an analysis of official rhetoric and methodological literature aimed at history teachers, I investigate the ideological functions performed by the concept of “historical falsification.” I show how it serves to reinforce a conspiratorial vision of Russia as a nation under siege, while simultaneously justifying the drive toward greater state control over history education.

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Remembering or Forgetting?

Accounts of the Recent Revolutionary Past in Dutch History Textbooks for Primary Education in the Early Nineteenth Century Author

Willeke Los

After several decades of political conflict and turbulence, in 1815 the Netherlands became a constitutional monarchy. In the ensuing process of nation-building, history education was considered an important means to instill feelings of national unity and concord into the hearts of children. This article seeks to investigate how this was possible in view of the recent revolutionary past. It analyzes accounts in history textbooks for primary education of the Patriot Revolt against Stadholder William V that took place in the 1780s and was suppressed in 1787, and of the Batavian Revolution that took place in 1795 and put an end to his rule. Although in many cases the historical narratives of these politically controversial events were adapted to suit the purpose of nation-building, the revolutionary past was by no means forgotten.

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Migration and Migrants between the Favorable and the Problematic

A Discourse Analysis of Secondary School Turkish History Textbooks from 1966 to 2018

Önder Cetin

amid the country's shifting political forces, including throughout the pro-Western Menderes era of the 1950s, an era whose longevity demonstrates the role of political orientations in shaping the conceptions of history education. Textbooks presenting

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Archaeological Narratives in Greek History Textbooks

From Texts to Pupils’ Interpretations

Maria Repoussi and Konstatina Papakosta

history and historical culture 30 and, on the other, that of theories of resistance. 31 Public history and historical culture studies highlight the multiple trajectories that influence history education in an informal but decisive way. Commemorations

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The “Imagined Other”

A Political Contextual Analysis of Secular and Hindu Nationalisms in Indian History Textbooks

Deepa Nair

BJP in 2000. This framework assigned the social sciences (especially history) the lofty task of “inculcating a sense of pride in the country and in being an Indian” and approached history education as a tool to “strengthen national identity” and to

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Memory Practices in the Classroom

On Reproducing, Destabilizing and Interrupting Majority Memories

Johanna Ahlrichs, Katharina Baier, Barbara Christophe, Felicitas Macgilchrist, Patrick Mielke, and Roman Richtera

This article draws on memory studies and media studies to explore how memory practices unfold in schools today. It explores history education as a media- saturated cultural site in which particular social orderings and categorizations emerge as commonsensical and others are contested. Describing vignettes from ethnographic fieldwork in German secondary schools, this article identifies different memory practices as a nexus of pupils, teachers, blackboards, pens, textbooks, and online videos that enacts what counts as worth remembering today: reproduction; destabilization without explicit contestation; and interruption. Exploring mediated memory practices thus highlights an array of (often unintended) ways of making the past present.

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Narratives and Multiperspectivity in Dutch Secondary School History Textbooks

Marc Kropman, Carla van Boxtel, and Jannet van Drie

The narratives about a nation's past taught in history education are a major focus of international research. 1 In many countries, textbooks are by far the most accessible sources of historical information for both pupils and teachers. The texts

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Working with the Cold War

Types of Knowledge in Swedish and Australian History Textbook Activities

Niklas Ammert and Heather Sharp

, but also as informed citizens post-schooling. The similarities in the overarching purposes of history education in Australia and in Sweden provide a sound base to begin a comparative analysis of the activities that accompany content in textbooks. The

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“The Pearl Harbor of the Twenty-first Century”?

A Comparative Analysis of Pearl Harbor and 9/11 in History Textbooks

Daniel Berman and Jeremy Stoddard

York: Routledge, 2011), 223–236. For the studies on the impact of memory on history education, see Felicitas Macgilchrist, Barbara Christophe and Alexandra Binnenkade, “Introduction Memory Practices and History Education,” Journal of Educational Media