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Looking for Something to Signify

Something to Signify Gender Performance and Cuban Masculinity in Viva

David Yagüe González

different disciplines: feminist theory, gender theory, and queer studies, among others. Each of them with a different agendas, they deal with gender and sexuality from a variety of points of view, trying to understand the power dynamics between genders

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On Sinofuturism

Resisting Techno-Orientalism in Understanding Kuaishou, Douyin, and Chinese A.I.

Yunying Huang

popular culture. In this article, I discuss representatives of Chinese popular culture that may not be familiar to outside audiences— wanghong style (internet celebrity style), tu style (rustic style), queer expression (in particular nv zhuang da lao

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“Banal Apocalypse”

An Interview with Author Ta-wei Chi on the New Translation of The Membranes

Jane Chi Hyun Park and Ta-wei Chi

of queer Taiwanese speculative fiction, and I had the opportunity to interview the author about some of these themes. The interview that follows is based on a series of email exchanges between Ta-wei and myself in 2019 and 2020. My role was that of a

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A. Anthony, Tess S. Skadegård Thorsen, Steen Ledet Christiansen, and Carmela Garritano

Reina Gossett, Eric A. Stanley, and Johanna Burton, eds., Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017), 419 pp. ISBN: 9780262036603 (hardback, $49.95)

Katharina Lindner, Film Bodies: Queer Feminist Encounters with Gender and Sexuality in Cinema (London: I. B. Tauris, 2018), 272 pp. ISBN: 9781784536244 (hardback, £72)

Saige Walton, Cinema’s Baroque Flesh: Film, Phenomenology, and the Art of Entanglement (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2016), 280 pp. ISBN 978 90 8964 951 5 (hardback, €95)

Marietta Kesting, Affective Images: Post-apartheid Documentary Perspectives (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2017). vi +278pp. ISBN: 9781438467856 (hardback, $95); ISBN: 9781438467849 (paperback, $29.95)

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Paul Walker

This article explores interactions with difference, highlighting what I call the “generosity paradox,” a term that refers to how we suspend disbelief and certainty in favor of a constructed potentiality not limited by preexistent knowledge or categories of authenticity and legitimacy. Touching on overlapping concepts from rhetoric, philosophy, gender studies, disability studies, and queer theory, the discussion explicates fictional encounters with radical alterity in the film Her (Spike Jonze, 2013) to show that attempted respite from frustrating, confusing, and frightening interactions limits our voice, undermines difference, and favors a unifying persuasive intent, which more likely than not involves an attempt to change Others rather than allowing our mutual differences to generatively remain.

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Brian Bergen-Aurand

Screen Bodies 3.2 engages with a wide variety of topics—fat studies, contemporary queer cinema, (pre)posterity, puzzle films, grief and truth in filmmaking, feminist materialism, digitized bodies, food and horror, and Maghrebi cinema. As well, the selection of articles in this issue represents studies of several media—tv programs, films, publicity stills, and photographs—from a number of locations around the globe—North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. What holds this general issue together, though, is a concern over expectation, assumption, and supposition: what we suppose screens and bodies do and what we suppose they do not do. As usual, with this journal, the focus of this consideration is doublehanded: screen as projection and screen as prohibition. The articles below explore the duality of screens and our responses to them. They engage screening expectation as showing, exposing, divulging, and, at the same time, as testing, partitioning, and withholding. To screen expectation is to reveal and conceal it, and, as these articles argue—each in their own way—this process is what we all engage in when we engage with screening.

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Andrew J. Ball

regarded the body as “the fulcrum” between screen images and new image-production technologies. We continue, in a different register, to examine matters of audience reception in Julian Binder's “Close to You: Karen Carpenter and the Body-Martyr in Queer

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Jane M. Kubiesa, Looi van Kessel, Frank Jacob, Robert Wood, and Paul Gordon Kramer

a multi-faceted one, which he reads as essentialist, materialist, queered, and, most important, as a reflection of the potentiality of humanity. The second section investigates repetition and replication. Authors Lindsay Ann Reid and Stephanie

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Andrew J. Ball

future, such as installation art, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, gaming, digital art, posthumanism, and film. And in keeping with the established emphases of the journal, these two issues feature the foremost innovations in queer theory, gender

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Ling Tang, Jun Zubillaga-Pow, Hans Rollmann, Amber Jamilla Musser, Shannon Scott, and Kristen Sollée

censorship; (4) how the consuming and producing of sexually explicit homoerotic Boy’s Love cultural products indicates a request for queer, feminist, and non-normative eroticism of Hong Kong and Chinese women; and (5) how the women in Hong Kong and China